Pi Kappa Phi brothers said two men approached their house the same night that Beta Theta Pi was robbed.

Michaela Brew / Sun News Photography Editor

Pi Kappa Phi brothers said two men approached their house the same night that Beta Theta Pi was robbed.

June 3, 2016

Cornell Lifts Suspension of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity, Confirms Hazing Incident

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The University has placed the Pi Kappa Phi fraternity on provisional recognition status following investigations confirming an incident of new member hazing, according to a University statement.

While on probation, the fraternity is required to place a live-in advisor in its house before beginning the fall semester and make improvements to its member recruitment and education practices, the University said.

Violation of Cornell policies during the provisional recognition period — which will last at least two years — will result in Pi Kappa Phi’s recognition being “immediately revoked,” the statement said.

The fraternity will be able to participate in new member recruitment while on probation, according to the University.

Pi Kappa Phi was suspended Feb. 23 due to allegations of hazing that involved “intimidation, verbal abuse, harassment, alcohol consumption and calisthenics,” a previous statement said.

13 thoughts on “Cornell Lifts Suspension of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity, Confirms Hazing Incident

  1. Absolutely insane that this was a CONFIRMED HAZING INCIDENT – something a student died from not long ago – and yet their punishment was minimal compared to Psi U. Cornell has an insane hidden agenda

    • Yeah it’s kind of crazy… Confirmed hazing incidents are almost as bad as confirmed presidential rape incidents

      • The thing is the rape had nothing to do with the suspension, the house (other than the president) was cleared of responsibility.

        • Yeah, and Al Capone received a harsh prison sentence only because of his tax evasion. There is a long history of harsh penalties for less heinous activities when you are suspected of something (or several somethings) far worse.

          • I’m not a lawyer….but… I don’t think that’s how the American justice system functions given the set penalties for the crimes you’re accused of…

  2. “Violation of Cornell policies during the provisional recognition period will result in Pi Kappa Phi’s recognition being ‘immediately revoked,’ the statement said.”

    VP Lombardi, “immediately”? That sounds like a summary execution with no hearing, no investigation, no opportunity for careful and fair deliberation. That sounds like what just happened to Pdi U. That’s a violation of everything a great university should stand for.

    I trust that violates your own sense of fairness and responsibility to the Cornell’s educational purpose. Or is this the Lombardi Doctrine?

    • Let’s take one word out of the sentence and judge the entire meaning of the sentence by that one word. That sounds like a summary execution with no hearing, no investigation, no opportunity for careful and fair deliberation.
      By “violation”, the sentence means that there has to be some proof that there was actually a violation. Notice that this article starts with “following investigations confirming an incident of new member hazing”. I’m not speaking to Cornell’s attempts to rein in the Greek system overall, but please try reading sometimes.
      Also, Psi U had enough egregious citations to earn them far more than than they got, so let’s just not even go there.

  3. Before people comment, a confirmed hazing incident is inherently vague given Cornell’s broad definition of hazing. Their incident could have been a scavenger hunt, and the supposed allegations could not even be what was confirmed by the decision. If the review board had found anything seriously flagrant, they would not have allowed the fraternity to remain on campus, so do not jump to assumptions about the severity of the incident. The University has a history of using small incidents to put a house in a position so that it will be easier to remove.

  4. Why does Cornell even have fraternities and sororities affiliated with it? Regardless of if they’ve ever gotten in trouble, it seems pretty obvious the the operations of the greek system are diametrically opposed to the objectives of Cornell or really any university. Can we just stop providing any sort of support (financial or otherwise) or engagement with this organizations? People should still be allowed to do as they please as members of a free society, especially when you’re supposed to be learning, exploring, and questioning norms, so it seems as crazy to ban a frat as it would be to ban a chess club or soccer club, but there’s no need for us to act like the greek system is a good thing. Maybe people will spend more time on academics or exploring hobbies rather than getting drunk every weekend.

    • It’s not that easy. There have been fraternities at Cornell since the school’s very founding in 1865. Greek Life is an entrenched institution within the university…and let’s not forget all the powerful alumni (like Mr. Dyson or the Johnson family), who were in fraternities. Heck, some buildings on campus are named after guys that were in fraternities (like Kimball Hall).

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