Seven committees, representing Cornell constituencies, determined the administrative and academic structure of the College of Business, administrators say.

Cameron Pollack / Sun Photography Editor

Seven committees, representing Cornell constituencies, determined the administrative and academic structure of the College of Business, administrators say.

July 1, 2016

College of Business Launch Marks ‘New Era’ of Cornell Education, Dean Says

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Previously Dean of the Johnson School, Soumitri Dutta was named to head the College of Business as dean in February.

Previously Dean of the Johnson School, Soumitri Dutta was named to head the College of Business as dean in February.

The deans of Cornell’s three accredited business colleges assumed new positions Friday as the much anticipated and hotly contested Cornell College of Business opened for business.

The newly merged Johnson Graduate School of Management, Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management and School of Hotel Administration will include an integrated admissions portal, cross-listing courses and improved career services, according to the University.

Seven area coordinators have also been appointed, and will work as professors with their colleagues in the college to improve the education in different business topics at Cornell.

Prof. Edward McLaughlin, applied economics and management, was named the interim dean of the Dyson School of Applied Economics in late June.

Prof. Edward McLaughlin, applied economics and management, was named the interim dean of the Dyson School of Applied Economics in late June.

Dean of the College of Business Soumitra Dutta predicted that the launch marks the beginning of “a new era of business education” at Cornell.

“It is an exciting date in the history of Cornell but by no means completes our transformation efforts,” he said. “In the coming months, we will continue to evolve our organization to create an exemplary college while enhancing the brands of its three schools.”

A brand study to continue solidifying the organizational structure and ambitions of the school will be launched in August, according to the University. An advisory council will begin meeting in the fall.

The announcement of the formation of the College of Business in January led to protest among students in the affected schools, concerned that the new college would jeopardize the unique strengths and identities of its constituent bodies.

Prof. Mark Nelson, accounting, was appointed the new dean of the Johnson School of Management Tuesday in early June.

Prof. Mark Nelson, accounting, was appointed the new dean of the Johnson School of Management Tuesday in early June.

Provost Michael Kotlikoff has sought on numerous occasions to reassure students, alumni and University donors that future plans for the college would be based in more substantial input from Cornellians past and present. He has also committed to maintaining the distinct programs present in the three schools residing in the business college.

“This effort has involved many faculty, staff, students, alumni, trustees and administrative leaders, and I am especially pleased to see the consensus developed between the schools on how we extend Cornell’s enormous impact in business education and research, and more effectively engage with many of the world’s major challenges,” he said.