Although the Red failed to score any goals in its loss to Buffalo, the game's first shot on goal  came from junior midfielder Karli Berry (above), who returned to the field after spending the last year sidelined by an injury.

Corinne Kenwood/Sun Staff Photographer

Although the Red failed to score any goals in its loss to Buffalo, the game's first shot on goal came from junior midfielder Karli Berry (above), who returned to the field after spending the last year sidelined by an injury.

September 3, 2018

Women’s Soccer Falls to Buffalo in Home Opener

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Struggling to convert shots into goals, Cornell fell to the University at Buffalo 0-2 in its first home game on Friday night.

While the Bulls (2-1) scored both of their goals in the second half, each team managed to stay busy on both sides of the ball throughout the game.

“Everyone on the team was locked in for the entire 90 minutes,” said senior captain Jessica Ritchie. “We worked hard and put Buffalo under significant pressure, so that is something to definitely be proud of.”

While it did not manage to clinch victory, Cornell (1-1) indeed generated consistent pressure. In terms of both shots and shots on goal the Red came out on top, with 15 and 9, respectively, to the Bulls’ 14 and 7.

“We were effective in creating chances all game long,” said head coach Dwight Hornibrook.

Despite the Cornell’s shooting advantage, the Bull’s goalkeeper made nine total saves to thwart each of the Red’s endeavors. Buffalo now holds a 4-3-2 historical advantage over Cornell.

Notably, the earliest shot on goal of the game came from junior midfielder Karli Berry, who returned to the field after a year sidelined by an injury.

“It is great to have Berry back,” Hornibrook said. “She embodies the spirit of this group with her passion to compete and win.”

While the Red excelled in opening up scoring opportunities, the loss serves as a reminder that the team will need to work on better capitalizing those offensive chances.

“We will continue to learn the importance of taking advantage of chances when they come,” Hornibrook said. “We must also be more careful in our own end with the ball.”