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PINERO | Kanye West Never Cared About Black People

I unfollowed Kanye West after the first MAGA tweet. Without hesitation, I jumped on the bandwagon calling for his “cancellation.” I spent most of Tuesday looking like the white guy blinking meme as I watched Mr. West word-vomit all over Twitter and call four hundred years of chattel slavery “a choice” on TMZ. This column was going to be a scathing condemnation. Instead, my curiosity led me to watch ’Ye’s extended conversation with Charlamagne, also released on Tuesday. Over the course of a virtually uninterrupted 105-minute stream-of-consciousness, I came to see things differently.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Re: ‘Affordable Care Act Provisions that Went Beyond Healthcare “unseen by the public eye,” Professor Says’

To the Editor:

I generally agree with the idea that the government should engage more actively with its constituents regarding federal policies to challenge the submerged state, but I believe the effects of the Affordable Care Act did not go unnoticed. Many initiatives in the ACA took years to implement, and they took effect gradually over the course of several years. A few of the milestones, such as long-term care insurance (2011), 3.8 percent surcharge on individuals who make over $200,000 (2013) and prohibition of insurance companies from denying individuals with preexisting conditions (2014) were all implemented after the 2010 midterm elections. Indeed, one of the most important pieces of the ACA — the Medicaid expansion — became effective in January 2014 and the Congressional Budget Office is continually updating the increase in health insurance coverage rate today. While there are provisions in the ACA that may go unnoticed, milestones like Medicaid expansion probably did not escape the public eye.

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AHMAD | The Problem With Kanye West’s ‘Free Thinking’

Last week, many of us felt the harrowing effects of what can only be described as a national tragedy: the downfall of Kanye West. As someone who has loved Kanye’s music since sixth grade, viciously supported him through the ups and downs of his beef with Taylor Swift, praised the diversity of his (albeit insanely overpriced) fashion line and even forgave him for his completely nonsensical rant on Ellen, I was, to say the least, disappointed when I saw his Twitter tirade of painfully unrelenting support for Trump. I will admit that when I first read the Tweet That Started It All, I wasn’t immediately horrified or shocked. In fact, I chuckled at the unironic use of the phrase “dragon energy,” and I couldn’t really argue with Kanye’s claim that he “loves everyone.” I told myself that this was just another inflammatory statement tweeted out for favorites, tabloid headlines and “Kanye West is so crazy” reactions. Simply put, I assumed he just said it for attention.

Guest Room

GUEST ROOM | Mental Health Promotion And Suicide Prevention: How Is Cornell Supporting Students?

 

Over the past year, many people have voiced concerns about student mental health, including criticisms of the university’s clinical services and efforts to prevent suicide. Wait times for counseling services are among the challenges we at Cornell Health have been working to address. With university support we have added new therapist positions which has shortened wait times and also increased the diversity of our staff. Access to mental health care is critical, because treatment works and many students are in need of it. It’s also important to reach students who may be reluctant to walk through our doors, so our Let’s Talk program places counselors in locations around campus for walk-in consultations.

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GOROKH | Nerve Gas, Spies and Secret Briefings

Following politics can be frustrating. You see decisions made on the basis of private motives and private information. Whatever efforts you make in inferring the missing pieces are often thwarted by the fact that some actions are motivated by nothing but plain human stupidity. So instead I kick back and stream the new season of Homeland (which involves plots about as unrealistic but a whole lot more entertaining than those on CNN). But then sometimes, especially when it comes to my homeland Russia, I just can’t help it.

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HUBSHER | Talks Most Says Least

As a senior in high school, I was vying for the “Class Clown” superlative but I would not be that lucky. In addition to “Class Gossip,” I also won “Talks Most Says Least.” It is pretty fucked up that this award had been approved by the administration. Four years later, I am about to graduate college. I am more proud of this superlative than I am of many of my other accomplishments. Looking back now, I can see that this label was and still is a common way to dismiss women with opinions, but this is me reclaiming it.

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BENITEZ | Hearing Dick Cheney

Imagine a bunch of chairs had been set up for a speaking engagement, and someone had tried to destroy as many of them as possible to decrease the number of people that could attend the engagement. (Assume too, for the sake of argument, that the number of chairs determine the possible audience size: the grass on which they are set up is wet and muddy, so people wouldn’t just be able to sit on the ground, and the speech will last for a tiring while, so standing is off the cards too.) For all intents and purposes, this appears to fall on the spectrum of silencing, albeit of a seemingly benign sort, and I suspect most of us would agree. When it therefore came to my attention that some students were last month taking as many free tickets as possible to Dick Cheney’s originally scheduled speaking engagement, I couldn’t help but be a little miffed. Such actions admittedly come from well-intentioned political activism. However, not only does it take advantage of the Cornell Republicans’ good will, but, more troublingly, it demonstrates the increasing political sectarianism within American society.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Prof responds to her statements quoted in ‘Cornell Students Rally in Support of Gaza Protest’

To the Editor:

In regards to a statement that I made at the rally last week in support of the people in Gaza, my comment, reported by Ms. Curley, was only a few words of a longer statement in which I indicated that the issue was not only a political issue, but a human rights issue, and that those interested didn’t need to know the deep politics of the issue in order to get involved and stand in solidarity with Palestine on the human rights issue alone. Since the Six Day War of 1967, the U.N. has repeatedly cited Israel for human rights violations in the Occupied Territories and Gaza, which has been described as the “largest outdoor prison in the world.”

In response to those who would characterize the situation as terrorist Palestinians vs. innocent Israelis, I suggest they refer to the U.N. “Report of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Palestinian territories occupied since 1967” from which I excerpt the following:
According to B’Tselem [The Israeli Information Center for Human Rights in the Occupied Territories], between 1987 and 2000 just under 1,400 Palestinians were killed by ISF [Israeli Security Forces]. After the year 2000, deaths of Palestinians caused by ISF accelerated, with more than 6,700 deaths, as at October 2013. Of this number, over 3,100 were civilians not involved in hostilities.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Re: ‘Cornell Students Rally in Support of Gaza Protest’

To the Editor: 

In her article, “Cornell Students Rally…”, Cornell Daily Sun reporter Julia Curley quotes CCJP founder Prof. Darlene Evans’ contention that “You don’t have to know about what’s going on in Palestine…to stand in solidarity with Palestine.” Let’s examine that contention. The CCJP represents as “non-violent” the Gaza/Palestinians who throw firebombs, attempt to plant explosives (IEDs and hand grenades) to breach the border with and invade Israel, and are exhorted by their elected government, Hamas, to then “eat the livers” of Israelis. Describing such actions and verbiage as “non-violent” suggests a seriously disordered CCJP agenda. Prof. Evans evidently feels you don’t have to know that there is a Gaza border closure by both Israel and Egypt. Gazans are not setting off IEDs, launching firebombs, burning tires or attempting to breach their border with Egypt, because they know Egypt’s military would not respond with the restraint shown by the IDF.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: A Warning in the Wake of Greenwood

To the Editor:

In what can only be laughably called a punishment, John Greenwood ’20 took a plea deal and was ordered to do 75 hours of community service — less time than the membership requirements of most Cornell service organizations — for an assault and racial slurs that, if committed by a black student against a white one, would have inevitably resulted in jail time, and no such plea deal. It is striking to come to the realization that we are living in a world where this can be considered an adequate reprimand for such community-wrenching actions. Greenwood barely received a slap on the wrist for something that has toppled our community’s sense of safety: a distorted response, when compared to our community’s reckoning in the wake of this incident. The truth is that distortion is, and has been, the reality. This case, like so many before it, became a war of attrition rather than a true criminal proceeding.