The cast of Dog Sees God: Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead at Risley Theater.

Dog Sees God: Remix On Nostalgia

Rather than inventing something never seen before, sometimes the most novel idea is a reiteration on the familiar. Cog Dog Theatre Troupe took this route with their production of Dog Sees God: Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead. Performed at Risley Theatre and directed by Sydney Wolfe ‘19 and Amber Pasha ‘20 this play imagines the characters from Charles Schultz’ Peanuts as teenagers in the throes of adolescence. With Charlie Brown having outgrown his name in favor of “CB”, it quickly becomes obvious that many of the characters are almost unrecognizable from their comic book days, but nevertheless they capture many issues familiar to us. In a moving reading of his letter to his unresponsive pen-pal, CB, played by Tyler Lloyd ‘19, commences the play by lamenting the recent and the horrifying death of his dog.

Music Department Presents “Song of the Land: Poems of Ishion Hutchinson”

Barnes Hall was packed for “Song of the Land: Poems of Ishion Hutchinson,” a performance presented by the Music Department that put Hutchinson’s poetry to compositions by graduate student composers. The performance presented a fusion of the old and the new, incorporating multiple forms of art to deliver a powerful concert. Guest artist Rachel Calloway, a mezzo soprano, sang a dramatic reading that conveyed the emotion communicated in the performance, and did so in a way that drew the audience in to share in the experience with her.  This innovative project brought the respective virtues of literature and music into a symbiotic relationship that managed to showcase both the artistry of the music and the postmodern themes of Hutchinson’s poetry. The English department’s Ishion Hutchinson writes narrative poetry that investigates colonialism through his depictions of landscape and the emotional weight of colonial history.

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Sex With Strangers at the Kitchen Theater

It is only appropriate that playwright Laura Eason chooses to reflect on the millennial obsession and consumption of authentic selfhood through psychological realism, a form that exposes private and supposedly authentic humanness. Literally walled off in a remote house and then, during act two, in an apartment, actors Leeanne Hutchison and Darian Dauchan strive to imitate authentic privacy through theatre. Their characters, Olivia and Ethan, aspire to achieve this by writing fiction, and, both character and actor, inevitably by social media. So the play dialogues inwards, towards a generation where pressure to authentically be (and perform) one’s self is supreme, monetized and burns through relationships. Sex With Strangers’ political effect is potent but undecided, and ultimately, like its form, a dialogue in itself.

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Redefining Space at the Johnson

Located in the Gold and Picket Family Video Galleries, Empathy Academy succeeds in synthesizing art and the human experience via an organic transmission of the unspoken immensity of the exhibition to the viewer. While the works embody the material forms conventionally tied to them (sculpture, film, etc.) the medium takes a platform that is undeniably human in nature. In “Colors, Cultures, Knots, and Time,” Ernesto Neto invites the viewer into a space of wordless dialogue. Neto’s installation consists of plastic rings serving as loci from which vividly colored cotton strings connect. The threads are not, however, limited to single hoop; many are seen taking a journey across rings and sharing their own space with that of others.

Voices From the Lodz Ghetto

For anyone who knows me, you know that I study the Holocaust. A lot. It is not a bizarre obsession, though my little sister is convinced that it is and that I am going to go crazy one day because of my studies. Great! In actuality, I just find the Holocaust extremely interesting.

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The Trestle at Pope Lick Creek Shines at Schwartz

The Department of Performing and Media Arts’ production of The Trestle at Pope Lick Creek explored complex personal relationships and the impact of the Great Depression on American families, serious themes which the cast of five was well equipped to handle. Led by Director Nick Fesette and Assistant Director Chisom Awachie ’17, the play is gripping, dark and surprisingly sexual. The play opens on Dalton Chase (Jack Press ’18), a 15-year-old boy, sitting in a room by himself and making shadow puppets, yelling at 17-year-old Pace Creagan (Elise Czuchna ’18) to go to hell. Shortly after, we see the two hanging out under a trestle bridge, waiting to watch the 7:10 train that Pace is committed to outrun. Pace, a typical tomboy, is unquestionably a bad influence, encouraging Dalton to try to outrun the train with her even though her friend Brett died doing the exact same thing, and meek Dalton is almost incapable of standing up to her.

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String Theory: The VIDA Guitar Quartet Coheres at Barnes

On Thursday night, the VIDA Guitar Quartet made its Ithaca debut at Cornell’s Barnes Hall. Since 2007, the British ensemble has been impressing a conscientious sonic footprint on listeners. Seeing them live, however, the interlocking nature of their artistry is apparent not only in their craft, but also in their choice and assembly of programming. There is, of course, plenty of savvy over which to marvel regarding each player’s technical wheelhouse. Mark Eden’s highs, Mark Ashford’s harmonizing and melodic leads, Amanda Cook’s unbreakable ground lines and Chris Stell’s rhythmic backbone (enhanced by tapping of the guitar body) make for a kindred fit that is rare among quartets of any constitution.

Questions of America’s Past and Future in Performing and Media Arts Presentation of “The Diary of an American Girl”

I watched The Diary of an American Girl, a play written by Cornell Performing and Media Arts student Aleksej Aarasether, on February 10th at the Schwartz Center. American Girl had been written for the Heermans-McCalmon Dramatic Writing Competition, and the PMA department showcased it as one of the winning screenplays. Two other performances, excerpts of a screenplay and a script, were also shown. The Diary of an American Girl depicts the story of Anna, a young Latinx girl born in America to with undocumented parents. The script flirts with the conceit of Anna’s diary, through which some of the story is told.

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Birds of East Africa is Taking Off at Kitchen Theatre

The Kitchen Theatre’s premiere of Birds of East Africa, a new play written by Wendy Dann and directed by Rachel Lampert, is incredibly quirky and starts out slow but becomes more meaningful as it progresses. The play feels disjointed at times but is saved by strong acting and its realistic portrayal of damaged relationships. As the play begins, two men dressed in colorful clothing meant to look like birds dance around the stage, and an ornithologist named Marion (Lena Kaminsky) appears soon after. The dancers often perform between scenes and sometimes interact with Marion. The birds she has studied have a constant presence in her life, even when she moves in with a college friend Stephen (Daniel Pettrow) and his husband Nick (Gabriel Marin) in Las Vegas, far from any hornbills, her professed favorite species.