EDITORIAL | Hillary Clinton for President

This election cycle has been bitter and divisive. The last debate showcased ugly language and personal attacks that have no place in a presidential forum; a deluge of leaks, ranging from emails to tapes, has shown Americans who their candidates are behind closed doors. Both mainstream candidates and third party alternatives have continually been forced to justify gaffes, offensive language and scandals on the campaign trail. From the early days of the primary to today, less than a month until Nov. 8, this has proved to be an election season like no other.

EDITORIAL: Towards a Healthier Community

Svante Myrick’s ’09 Ithaca Plan recognizes that the current system has not been effective in addressing heroin use. His attempt at finding a better approach — by forming a municipal drug strategy committee and engaging over 200 Ithacans for the past two years — is bold and community-oriented.

EDITORIAL: Svante Myrick ’09: The Heroin Hero?

To curb heroin overdoses in Tompkins County, Ithaca Mayor Svante Myrick ’09 announced Monday that he hopes the City of Ithaca will host the first supervised heroin injection facility in the United States. According to his proposal, at such a facility, heroin users would be allowed to inject themselves under the supervision of a nurse and be connected with recovery services. While Myrick worked to model his plan after similar facilities in Canada, Europe and Australia, the plan’s feasibility — given the significant legal and political hurdles to come — remains questionable. While we find Myrick’s emphasis on prevention addiction through mental health professionals admirable, we question whether this is the correct solution in regards to heroin usage given the emphasis on creating an injection facility. Myrick has not yet identified how the facility will be funded — through tax dollars or otherwise.

EDITORIAL: Considering the Effectiveness of Need-Blind Policy

Amid another tuition hike, Provost Michael Kotlikoff announced Thursday that Cornell would no longer be need-blind when considering the admission of international applicants due to insufficient funding for financial aid. Many students immediately expressed concern that this policy change would decrease the economic diversity of the international student population, with some thinking the new policy favors high-income and wealthier students. Judgement on whether this admissions policy change will affect the diversity of the school needs to be withheld until the administration concretely lays out how they anticipate reappropriating the presumed monetary gain or decrease in debt from the switch to a need-aware policy. Whether this change will negatively affect Cornell, which has a significantly smaller endowment compared to the peer institutions in which we hope to remain competitive with, depends greatly on whether non-monetary intentions exist and what exactly they are with this sort of change in admissions policy. Need-blindness is a great principle in theory because it says a school solely considers the quality of a student during admissions.