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KELLER | Join The Sun

Kurt Vonnegut once opined on The Sun’s role in his life saying,  “I was happiest when I was all alone — and it was very late at night, and I was walking up the hill after having helped put The Sun to bed.” After signing out the day’s pages and switching off the office lights I’ve done that walk and I know that hill. But I was never all alone. I tend to rant about The Sun. I rant and argue about why The Sun matters — the crucial role it serves in holding Cornell’s administration accountable, telling important stories and uplifting a diverse array of voices. I fervently believe that more people should join The Sun, talk to The Sun and read The Sun every day.

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BRONFIN | Revolving Around The Sun

I joined The Sun because I loved sports. And partially because my best friend Scott joined his college newspaper and I figured if Scott, a decidedly average writer, could cover sports in college, then so could I. But mostly because I loved sports. It’s been four years, and my love for sports has diminished. Yes, I still follow LeBron James way too closely for anyone outside of Cleveland and I could rattle off far too many Division I college mascots, but I find myself disinterested in games or standings or even entire sports (sorry, baseball). Yet, thanks to my time on The Sun, that passion for sports has been replaced with a love of writing, an appreciation for journalism and a community of talented, caring friends.

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GLASS | The Old College Try

Divining is a pseudo-scientific and semi-magical practice where with just the aid of a bi-pronged stick, one walks across an expanse of land in an attempt to find underground water by feel and faith alone. It is, perhaps, the only way I can describe how the last four years here at Cornell have felt. After wandering around largely aimlessly with an intense yet misplaced thirst for success driven by a strong aversion to letting people down, while looking objectively silly, I will be the first to admit that despite my best efforts, I did not find water. The Cornell Daily Sun, however, was the closest thing to it. I was one of those overeager high school newspaper editors-in-chief, which is unfortunately more of a personality type than a job, and I sought out The Sun as a first semester freshman. I remember bussing down to the brick and ivy offices near the Commons and thinking that while it was pretty neat that there were so many people buzzing around and looking so serious, I would just write a few articles and bail.

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LAPLACA | 3 a.m. Thoughts

I have never written for The Sun until now. Since sophomore year, I have been a designer. When I went to the Sun info session, I had no idea what section I wanted to join. Truth be told, I thought the Design Department was a writing section about fashion and wrote it off (I know, I’m shaking my head too). Four weeks later, I somehow was asked to design a front page — mind you, I had little to no design experience before The Sun, my major is ILR!

Guest Room

GUEST ROOM | Outing Clubs: Education in the School of Life

On April 11, the Penn State Outing Club was forced to end its 98 year relationship with the outdoors. Starting next semester, the club will not be allowed to organize student-led trips due to it “being above the University’s threshold of acceptable risk for recognized student organizations.” It was a devastating blow, but the club is fighting back. For nearly 100 years, this club has fostered an appreciation of the natural environment, leadership, outdoor skills and camaraderie. Together with their strong alumni network they are now fighting to regain the ability to provide these compelling outdoor experiences. We, the Cornell Outing Club (COC) strongly support PSOC in their fight.