Many international students are unsure how welcome they will be at Cornell following Trump’s election.

International Students Fear For Future Under Trump

“Although I’ve told them that things are better than they seem, [my parents] are seriously re-considering whether they should send my sister to the United States for her undergraduate degree next year,” he said.

GUEST ROOM | Shattering the Glass Ceiling

I am proud to cast my vote for our first female president, Hillary Rodham Clinton. I respect her, I admire her and I cannot wait for her to represent our country. Hillary has comprehensive and feasible goals. She intends to bolster our gun control policies, preventing those who are a danger to themselves and others from owning lethal weapons. She envisions welcoming 65,000 persecuted Syrian refugees who need our help.

SCHULMAN | Your Vote Can Make a Difference

Originally, I did not want to write about the election because both presidential candidates are depressing. One candidate is clearly the lesser of two evils, but both candidates will only widen racial and economic divides in this country. I changed my mind though because many people have misconceptions about the race and its consequences. Although both major party presidential candidates will only polarize our system further, we can still improve our system tomorrow by voting. Plenty of politicians are running for town council, state assembly, congress and senate on exciting platforms designed to bring us together.

GROSKAUFMANIS | She’s With Us

I have a lot of questions at the end of this election cycle. Why did immigration become such an intense focal point this year? Why doesn’t Hillary bring up the progress of the current economy more? Who decided that Trump’s son should have any kind of presence on Twitter? At times, I’ve questioned why Hillary wanted to run again at all.

Cornell professors say Trump's candidacy has transformed the Republican Party — and likely not for the better.

Has Trump Killed the Republican Party?

Several Cornell professors and students tell different stories of the roots and implications of Trump’s rise through GOP ranks. Their analysis diverges on whether the candidate has corrupted the Republican party or merely carried conservatives’ policy and rhetoric to their logical conclusions.

Many Cornellians, including Cornell Republicans, have chosen to cast their votes for third-party candidates like Gary Johnson.

‘Disenchanted’ Students Seek Alternative to Clinton and Trump

In some ways, the Cornell Republicans have been examples of this movement: the group broke party lines to endorse Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson over the Republican nominee on Sep. 4. Almost immediately after this decision, the New York Federation of College Republicans revoked the chapter’s credentials, chastising the organization for supporting another party’s candidate.

EDITORIAL: Capt. John Plumb for Congress

Tomorrow, millions of Americans will vote. A significant number of Cornellians are casting absentee ballots for their home state (and for those who haven’t yet, this is a gentle reminder to get those in soon), but students registered in Ithaca will vote in a congressional election that has become as contentious as the Clinton-Trump face-off. Democratic challenger Navy Captain John Plumb is vying with incumbent Congressman Tom Reed (R-N.Y.) to represent New York’s 23rd congressional district in the House of Representatives. Although the vitriol hurled by both campaigns is alarming, Plumb has proven the stronger contender with a platform that would actually support New York residents. One of the first congressmen to endorse Republican nominee Donald Trump, Reed has continually supported misguided, if not dangerous, policies.