HABR | On Bernie Bros and Their Own Undoing

Bernie Sanders’ (D-Vt.) rise from relatively unknown senator to viable presidential candidate could not have been possible without the help of his loyal supporters. These supporters, mostly younger, including many students, women and minorities, are attracted by his relatively progressive politics and promise of change. However, while many of Sanders’ backers pride themselves on being progressive, their actions in promoting his campaign often suggest otherwise. The term “Bernie bro” describes supporters of Sanders that are primarily young, white and male. These men have a reputation for being obnoxious and overzealous, and often misogynistic.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR | Bernie can make college affordable again!

To the Editor:
Both private and public college tuition costs have increased exponentially since I attended Cornell in the early ’70s. Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-Vt.) thinks it’s outrageous that today’s students will be saddled with huge student loan debts, sometimes as high as $100,000. He advocates a tax on Wall Street speculation that will enable public colleges and universities to offer tuition-free education, and he’s fighting to significantly reduce student loan interest rates. In addition, Bernie has consistently voted to raise funding for public schools and to reduce class sizes. Bernie’s proposals show ingenuity and a concern for the ability of working class students to obtain a good education.

Photo courtesy of The New York Times.

Petition Urging Bernie Sanders To Visit Cornell Gains Support

A petition urging Democratic Presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-Vt.) speak at Schoellkopf Field before New York’s April 19 primary — created by Ithaca resident Alexander Stick— has received over  3,000 signatures in under a week. “New York is pivotal for the Bernie Sanders campaign … let’s get enough signatures to fill the 25,597 seats in Schoellkopf Field at Cornell University,” the petition reads.   
Stick said in his petition that upstate New York is  home to “one of the highest concentrations of [Sanders] supporters in the country.”
Kayla Elyse Brooks, a research technician in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, and a member of the Facebook group ‘Cornellians for Bernie Sanders 2016,’ said that she would welcome a Sanders rally at Cornell. “I think it would be great for a lot of the students who have adopted their parents’ views to see Bernie in front of them speaking to our generation about our future,” Brooks said. Andrea Stone ’16, creator of the Cornellians for Bernie Sanders 2016 Facebook page, also strongly supported having the  presidential candidate speak on campus. “I think Bernie Sanders is the candidate with the most competent resume and background experience needed to effectively lead our country into an era of technological and educational advancement,” she said.

DAVIES | Hillary Clinton’s Ideology Gap

I would rather have Bernie Sanders as president, but Hillary Clinton as the Democratic nominee. Such is Sanders’ electability problem, distilled. His policies and ideology may be more in line with mine but his chances in the general election are slim. Despite polls’ projections of Sanders’ electoral strength against the top flight of GOP contenders, Americans’ ideological attitudes towards what they consider socialism will prevail in denying him victory. Why else would the Republican Party support and defend Bernie “Hammer and Sickle” Sanders?

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Students Hold Mock Democratic Presidential Debate

Corrections appended 
Three Cornell students represented Democratic presidential candidates former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, former Governor Martin O’Malley (D-M.D.) and Senator Bernie Sanders (D-V.T.) in a mock Democratic primary debate Wednesday, arguing over issues that included gun violence, student debt, climate change and income inequality. During the 60 minute debate, which featured opening remarks, general questions, audience questions and closing remarks, the three students spoke from the perspectives of the candidates they were standing in for. Natalie Brown ’18, who represented Clinton, emphasized her comprehensive dedication and lifelong service to the country throughout the debate. “My experience in serving this nation is what makes me a unique candidate,” Brown said. “I spent my entire professional life fighting for the American people, fighting for their interests in three different ways: as the Secretary of the State, the First Lady and the Senator of New York, and I have pursued progressive causes throughout my entire career.”
Danyoung Kim ’16, who spoke as Sanders, argued for the need to look at examples in socialist democratic nations such as Denmark and Sweden in addressing issues that included social security and keeping Wall Street in check.