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GUEST ROOM | Reforming the Greek System Before We Throw it Away

Correction appended. This Guest Room column is in response to the Guest Room column “Gone With Greek Life, for Good.” I came to Cornell with no intention of joining Greek life. The majority of my high school class went on to universities that seemed more focus on football and frat parties than education. I heard countless stories about Greek life that I wanted no part in.

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GUEST ROOM | Disaffiliating is Not Enough

After reading Ara Hagopian’s recent column titled “Don’t Decry the Greek System if You Use It for Your Own Gain,” I felt a flush of emotion: anger, sadness, shame and, ultimately, an overarching sense of disempowerment. As someone who holds multiple marginalized identities and actively works to reform my fraternity and the Greek system at large, I felt betrayed. I first want to challenge the idea that there is an option to “not participate” in the Greek system at Cornell. Any undergraduate student who attends Cornell interacts with Greek members on a daily basis, benefits from the financial contributions of wealthy Greek alumni and creates a professional network that is heavily influenced by the Greek system. Historically, these privileges were created by excluding people of color, the LGBT+ community, people of low socioeconomic status, international students, religious minorities and many others.