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LIEBERMAN | Cornell Health Doesn’t Meet Student Needs

One of the most serious threats to students’ safety at Cornell is our mental health. The administration claims to care about our well-being, but lately I’ve been seeing evidence to the contrary. A few weeks ago, I saw an article on Facebook that left me feeling frozen. The headline read, “Pollack Rejects Creation of Independent Task Force to Review Cornell’s Mental Health Policies.” I clicked the link, and you should too. I was introduced to Sophie Hack McLeod, a Cornell student who took her own life in 2016.

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New Program Lets Students Open Up to Other Students

“We are trying to provide students with a space where they can speak openly and honestly with each other,” said Maddie Feldman ’19, co-president of Cornell Reflect. “We want everyone to be real. We want to give everyone a chance where they can choose whatever topic they want and know that they won’t be judged.”

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S.A.’s Lift Your Spirits Day Gathers Cornellians to Raise Awareness for Mental Health

As students crossed the Arts Quad on their way to class on Friday afternoon, they wove around tables set up by different student organizations to commemorate Lift Your Spirits Day, an event organized by the Student Assembly. In fact, Friday’s event was the second Lift Your Spirits Day held this year. S.A. members explained that this event began in 2009 to raise awareness for mental health on campus, especially as a result of the circumstances of that year. “This is an event that is ingrained within Cornell because it’s been happening since 2009 or 2010 when there was a string of suicides on campus. It was put on by the Student Assembly with a bunch of different student organizations on campus to lift spirits in response to that,” said Matt Indimine ’18, organizer of the event.