Librarians have put out supplies for students to knit, crochet and destress in a project to decorate the entryway gates.

Jing Jiang / Sun Staff Photographer

Librarians have put out supplies for students to knit, crochet and destress in a project to decorate the entryway gates.

October 23, 2018

Students ‘Yarn Bomb’ Library Security Gates With Knitting and Crocheting Project

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Winter is coming for Cornell students and library security gates alike. To keep the gates warm, Cornell students can crochet or knit covers at Olin, Mann, Math and Vet Libraries when they need to take a break from studying.

Susette Newberry, head of research and learning services at Olin and Uris Libraries, told The Sun that the project “Yarn bomb the gates!” came out a week ago in order to take a “creative approach to make the security gates more friendly.”

To participate, students simply need to drop by any of the four libraries during their open hours and knit or crochet 8”, 9’’ and 15’’-wide rectangles with the provided supplies, which include yarn, needles and crochet hooks.

So far, the knitting has covered 60 percent of one of the security gates at Olin Library, according to Newberry.

In addition to creating decorations, Newberry said that “Yarn bomb the gates!” also helps students destress.

“When you are focusing on something really intently, especially if it’s on a screen, sometimes it just helps to give your eyes some relief, so that you’re using your hands and a different part of your brain,” she said. “All the students I have talked to have enjoyed contributing to it and looking at what other people have contributed.”

For those who don’t know how to knit or crochet, volunteers have also offered to teach. Retired Cornell math professor Daina Tamina, who has published a book on crocheting and “has used crochet to create geometric models,” is one of the volunteers at the Math Library in Malott Hall.

Faizah Zakaria, a visiting fellow from the Southeast Asia program, said she participated in the project for the first time on Tuesday afternoon but already planned on coming back to knit more.

“I find it a soothing break from my work,” she told The Sun.