Cornells-Happiest-Accidents

Alicia Wong / Graphics & Sketch Editor

March 12, 2020

Cornell’s Happiest Accidents | “Long Live the—”

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Allison Park ’23, Long Live the—, 2019.

Oil paint, 20” x 24’

Allison Park

Oil paint, 20” x 24’

 

This is an oil painting done to symbolize the violence against women. There are so many horror stories regarding the abduction of women, and it’s only fair that it’s represented in a disturbing way. Dressed in a white dress, the girl portrayed has a look of innocence while an unknown figure is beheading her. Though the image is rather unsettling, her face is calm, and what should be a gruesome scene is displayed in composure. There is certainly a duality between beauty and violence in this piece, which I feel accurately displays the confusing brutality towards women. Women should not feel scared to do things that men are freely able to do without thought. Women should not have to constantly look behind them to make sure they are not being followed. This fear is very real and not talked about enough.

 

Editor’s Review: Brian Lu ’23

 

I definitely felt that the purpose of the artist was achieved; the dark background with the extended hands appeared not only ominous but also incredibly sinister. Although the figure appears blank and serene, I can’t help but feel a sense of dread. Park’s painting truly embodies the message she conveys, with the subdued colors furthering the unsettling feel of Long Live the—, forcing our eyes to stare as she is beheaded in this silent image.

 

 

Brian Lu is a freshman in the College of Arts and Sciences. He currently serves as Assistant Arts Editor on The Sun’s board. He can be reached at blu@cornellsun.com.