Cornell regular decision applicants viewed their admissions decisions on Thursday evening. However, the University said it will no longer release detailed application data on admit rates and student demographics during the admissions cycle.

Jing Jiang / Sun Senior Photographer

Cornell regular decision applicants viewed their admissions decisions on Thursday evening. However, the University said it will no longer release detailed application data on admit rates and student demographics during the admissions cycle.

March 27, 2020

Cornell to No Longer Report Acceptance Rate During Admissions Cycle

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Cornell welcomed the Class of 2024 on Thursday evening, but admitted students won’t soon find out the acceptance rate or demographics: The University will no longer report application data when admission decisions are released each fall and spring.

Jonathan Burdick, vice provost for enrollment, told The Sun in a statement that the University will instead release application numbers after the admissions year has ended — a move that arrives because the University does not want to discourage qualified applicants.

“While metrics such as application numbers and admissions rates are an area of focus for many as they review annual activity in higher education, Cornell’s thorough and holistic review processes mean that no one applicant’s chances can be guided by ‘averages,’” Burdick said.

This shift in reporting applicant data began several months ago, according to the University. However, Cornell published early decision admissions statistics in December, when the early acceptance rate increased to 23.8 percent for the first time in four years.

All Ivy League colleges notified regular decision applicants Thursday at 7 p.m. — but Cornell is the only institution of the eight to announce it will now withhold admissions statistics. Columbia University and Dartmouth College have yet to release their incoming class applicant data.

“Cornell’s highest priority remains to encourage a broad and diverse pool of applicants to consider their opportunities here,” Burdick said.