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Coltivare’s Corbin’s Cauliflower: A Vegan Delicacy

Having trouble getting in your daily source of vegetables? Head to Coltivare, located on 235 South Cayuga Street, to have your mind blown away by a cauliflower dish that tastes so good you would never imagine it’s just vegetables! Before we get to the delicious meals, let’s take a look at what the restaurant truly stands for. Coltivare comes from the Italian verb “to cultivate.” The restaurant cultivates in various ways: The land, since 60 percent of their ingredients are sourced from the local area; learning, through its dynamic partnership and innovative ‘Farm to Bistro’ program; and community outreach programs such as fundraising dinners and charitable giving in Tompkins County. Each month Coltivare offers a “Student Special,” which sets aside $5 with every order and donates the accumulated money to local schools in order to combat child hunger.

A cow, wearing a sensor that signals to robots when its time for milking, ambles towards a milking machine at the Kalm dairy farm in Ebetsu, on Hokkaido, Japan, Nov. 7, 2019. (Noriko Hayashi/The New York Times)

Food Ethics | The New Cash Cow: How Solar Can Save Dairy Farms

Borden Dairy Co., one of America’s oldest and largest dairy companies, on January 6, became the second major milk producer to file for bankruptcy in the last three months after Dean Foods, America’s largest milk producer, filed for bankruptcy in November. Borden Dairy says that tumbling milk consumption combined with the rising price of milk crippled them with debt. In addition to these two large bankruptcies in the dairy industry, more than 2,700 small-and-mid-size family dairy farms went out of business last year and 94,000 have stopped producing milk since 1992. Consumption has been dropping steadily, with overall sales falling by 13% in the last decade. It seems that many Americans are moving on from cow milk.

Pg-6-Dining-Essay-Maca-(Meridith-Kohut-via-NYTimes)

Food Ethics | Perú, Pepe and Prayers

As a lawyer, my father traveled to other parts of Perú and even other countries following different judicial cases of interest, and he loved every day of his job. Whenever my father came back, he always brought interesting travel stories and sometimes even food. He was a firm believer in buying in bulk from people who lived nearby the sea or those who farmed. He loved seafood so much that he wished he could eat it every day, but he knew that it was not possible since he could not stop by the seafood market in Callao, Perú daily. Whenever he travelled by the coast, he would bring fresh fish back.

Courtesy of The Financial Times.

Dig In | Woke Wall Street: Using Private Capital to Fight Animal Agriculture

“If you are concerned about human health, if you are concerned about climate change, [then take a look at] animal agriculture, [which is] number two or three in terms of the contributors to climate change.” This is how Adam Bendell ’83, CEO of Toniic, began his interview with me at the Financial Times Investing for Good USA Conference on Dec. 5.

Courtesy of Jessica Kwong '18, owner of Jack & Friends.

The Road Less Traveled Leads to Vegan Jerky: An Interview with Jack & Friends founder Jessica Kwong ’18

With graduation looming, the frequency of nosy questions about post-graduation life from parents, friends, friends of parents and parents of friends far and wide reaches its peak. “What are you doing after graduation?” Is a question every senior dreads answering, but for Jessica Kwong ’18, the question brought on an entirely new crisis: Accept the return offer for one of the biggest snack companies in the world or start from scratch building her very own company? She eventually decided on the latter, and Kwong declined the job offer in favor of creating what would eventually become Jack & Friends in March 2019, a plant-based jerky line with jackfruit as a main ingredient.

Collegetown Bagels (Katie Sims/Sun Staff Photographer)

Dining Department’s Goodbyes to CTB on College Ave

By now, it’s old news that Collegetown Bagels and Ruloff’s on College Ave. are set to be demolished next semester to make way for new student housing. But the true reality of the situation has yet to hit us as the corner of College and Oak still looks as lively as ever. While it’s hard to imagine what Collegetown will be like without CTB in just one short semester, The Sun’s dining department writers are already starting to reminisce on what CTB has meant for them during their time at Cornell.

Joe Walter / Sun File Photo

A Foodie Farewell to the Top 10 Collegetown Establishments That Have Closed in the Past Decade

Restaurants and bars are constantly closing and opening; the skyline and structure of Collegetown never stays the same two years in a row. However, no matter how many places come and go, the old names are places alumni will always remember as a crucial part of their Cornell experience. Here are the top ten Collegetown destinations we lost this past decade, still full of the memories and friendships made that will continue to live on for a lifetime.