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Food Ethics | Worries to Wonder

When I was 14 years old, I went hunting with my dad on youth hunting weekend. It’s the weekend before the official hunting season begins, giving novice hunters a better chance. Going into this, I asked two questions: ‘do I deserve to eat meat if I can’t kill an animal? ,’ and, more importantly, ‘how will I feel after this?’ The best way to find out seemed to be to shoot first and ask questions later. I was even planning on butchering the animal myself, which I felt was a crucial step in answering these questions.

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Dining Hall March Madness Matchups

The time has come. The Dining Department will be officiating our very first March Madness tournament. Witness as Cornell University’s finest eateries battle head-to-head in hopes of becoming the most popular eatery on campus. Throughout the month, we will be polling all the writers and editors of the Sunspots, Dining, Arts and Entertainment and Opinion departments. 

While many of these locations are long-time favorites, such as Trillium, and Flora Rose House, underdogs like Nasties and the hotly contested Okenshields will need to snatch a lead early on if they hope to stay in the race. Will they find the support to do so?

Coffee beans at Finca Rosa Blanca Coffee Plantation Resort in Alajuela, Costa Rica on Oct. 23, 2019. (Toh Gouttenoire/The New York Times)

Caffeine Dependents Take Heed: Bring Your Own Mug

I never leave home without my phone, wallet, keys, water bottle and coffee mug. Those last two items have become essentials on campus. Before I left for college, I was gifted a fourteen-ounce stainless steel carafe by my mom, who supported my coffee consumption. As soon as I set foot on campus a year and a half ago, I began drinking coffee almost daily. According to an article in The New York Times, coffee in moderation is associated with lowered risk of mortality and was included in the 2015 dietary guidelines as part of a healthy diet.

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Food Ethics | Beans and Bread

The 40-acre farm in Hawai’i which I called home for the fall of 2017 was riddled with homemade signage. Pieces of wood were painted to remind that there was  “no toilet” and to “use tree! ,” to teach you “proper poopage” in a compost toilet and to tell you to “Get naked!” in the shower. There was also less informational signage that reinforced some important life lessons like “be with the flow” and to “eat your food like water, and your water like air.” One of these signs hung in a particularly prominent place next to the picnic tables at which we ate. It was framed by bunches of ripening plantains and written with a washed out orange and pink paint.

(Michelle Zhiqing Yang / Sun Staff Photographer)

Inside Mango Mango’s Tastiest and Smelliest Offerings

The opening of Mango Mango, a specialty Asian dessert restaurant, has brought much excitement to the Ithacan food scene. Mango Mochi

The mochi craze is still very much among us. As a dish that symbolizes fortune in many countries, Mochi has been one of the most popular Asian dessert items.Traditionally, Mochi is served hot in two ways. The first is a filled mochi, usually with sesame paste or sweetened red beans. The second is pieces of mochi which is dipped into cane sugar or Japanese molasses.

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Food Ethics | Confessions of An Ignorant Bread-Lover

Maybe you’re familiar with the fact that Oprah Winfrey has a partnership with Weight Watchers. This would not have been something I’d have known about had it not been for a particularly strange, and thus memorable, commercial I saw at some point during the past couple of years. Oprah advertised what seemed to be a new conception of Weight Watchers,hinging on one important factor for her. “I LOVE bread,” Oprah professed earnestly and seemingly out of the blue. To some, this could seem hilarious.

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Sangam the Sleeping Giant

“Sangam is a sleeping giant hidden under the blanket of Mehak’s reputation, and today I got my first glimpse at what’s lying beneath the covers.”

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Coltivare’s Corbin’s Cauliflower: A Vegan Delicacy

Having trouble getting in your daily source of vegetables? Head to Coltivare, located on 235 South Cayuga Street, to have your mind blown away by a cauliflower dish that tastes so good you would never imagine it’s just vegetables! Before we get to the delicious meals, let’s take a look at what the restaurant truly stands for. Coltivare comes from the Italian verb “to cultivate.” The restaurant cultivates in various ways: The land, since 60 percent of their ingredients are sourced from the local area; learning, through its dynamic partnership and innovative ‘Farm to Bistro’ program; and community outreach programs such as fundraising dinners and charitable giving in Tompkins County. Each month Coltivare offers a “Student Special,” which sets aside $5 with every order and donates the accumulated money to local schools in order to combat child hunger.