Karsten Moran / The New York Times

Food Ethics | Ethiopian Avocados

During my six-month sojourn in Ethiopia, I had the joy of working with an nongovernmental organization (NGO) by the name of the Ethiopian Education Foundation and living in the capital city of Addis Ababa. Every morning at 7 a.m., the managers and I maneuvered around the hostel making sure our students were prepared for class; breakfast, consisting of bread and bananas, was eaten and the usual suspects attempting to play hooky were dealt with. After a chaotic morning of fifty students eating, clamoring and readying themselves for class, I was free. The students left by 7:40 a.m. and I was out the door by 7:41. I twisted and twirled down the unpaved streets of the residential neighborhood surrounding our hostel.

Jessica Pettway / The New York Times

Shortage. COVID-19. Not Again

Shelves are empty, supply weak, prices heavy. There’s a shortage throughout the nation already. Shoppers are nervous, but on the surface they’re not calm or ready. Personal Protective Equipment and toilet paper, stand aside; it’s meat’s turn to have a shortage. Or is it?

Benjamin Velani -  Dining Editor for the 138th Editorial Board. (Ben Parker / Sun Assistant Photography Editor)

That’s a Full Lid – Spring 2020

This has been one hell of a start to 2020. It has shown us how negligent we can be when it comes to taking care of each other, and it has shown us the extent to which we take care providers for granted. When I say care providers, I don’t just mean doctors and nurses; I mean the garbage collector, the Chick-fil-A cook, the woman stocking empty grocery store shelves and the 40 year employee showing up to work everyday and finding new ways of doing the same work. Re-imagining jobs that have been the same for decades is no easy feat. But people have done that invisible work so you don’t have to worry about getting your family sick when snacking on spicy chicken sandwiches for a special Friday dinner.

Murali Saravanan '20 is one of the Dining Department's two graduating seniors. Best of luck with everything that comes next, and thank you for all of your hard work these last four years. (Murali Saravanan / Sun Staff Writer)

Murali Dreams of Good Food

This is my last article. I’ve been writing for the Dining Department for four years now, and, to be perfectly honest, I am not ready to say goodbye. But, that’s mostly because I have annoyingly discovered that I have multiple thoughts left to tell all of you about! So, I guess instead of multiple separate posts, you’ll have to deal with the abridged versions. Boba is not that good.

Ben Parker / Sun Assistant Photography Editor

Food Ethics | Medicine for the Lonely

While walking up the stairs in my house, I saw my brother Mike’s door was propped open. I popped my head in to see how he was doing. Talking with him, we happened upon the topic of illness. “My throat has been so sore that it hurts even to swallow. I wouldn’t mind the cough otherwise.”

Well, I had a solution for that!

José Andrés (center) cooking in Puerto Rico.(Eric Rojas / The New York Times)

Recipes For The People: A Hot Plate of Food When It’s Needed Most

Two weeks ago, I came across a video on Twitter called #RecipesForThePeople. It was a cooking video posted by José Andrés, a Spanish-American chef and founder of World Central Kitchen, a non-profit devoted to providing meals in the wake of natural disasters. In this six minute clip, Andrés and his daughters made angel hair pasta and tomato sauce as they sang and danced their way through Hamilton. The internet went crazy — from, “I did not think I could love José Andrés more. I was wrong.

Nicole Rovine, Sun Contributor

ROVINE | Chocolate Chip Cookies for the Wellness Trend Obsessed

The more passionate about health & wellness you are, the more familiar you might be with the delicate balancing act of chasing self-improvement and finding pure self-acceptance. I love eating in a way that makes me feel good from a holistic perspective and I know that minimizing grains, dairy and processed sugar helps with that. I also love chocolate. I love these cookies. They’re as “indulgent” and delicious as any.

max

From Statler Hall to Eleven Madison Park: A Cornell Alum Success Story

This week, I was lucky enough to interview Max Aronson, a recent Cornell graduate from 2019. Graduating from the School of Hotel Administration with a concentration in Beverage Management, he is now an assistant server at Eleven Madison Park — a fine dining restaurant located in the Flatiron District of Manhattan. Eleven Madison Park is ranked third among The World’s 50 Best Restaurants in 2016 and is known for their taste and presentation. Let’s take a look at how Max is doing today. 1.

Kathryn Stamm / Sun News Editor

If I am Drinking Straight from the Tap, Those Microbes are Drinking from the Tap

For the first time that day, I scuttled down the few steps outside of my apartment building. It was already 2:00 p.m., and I took the opportunity to stretch my arms and move my body. A typical April day in quarantined upstate New York, mid-forties and cloudy with sporadic rain showers. I took a seat on a wooden bench on the sidewalk. With the corner of my eye, I spotted a jar hugging the leg of the bench.

Brittainy Newman / The New York Times

How to? | Grocery Shopping During COVID-19

I didn’t want to come home. I enjoyed eating on campus, picking up apples at GreenStar and drinking cappuccinos from Gimme! Coffee. But even before I left Cornell to live at home with my parents, my family was discussing the plan for grocery shopping. My sister, who lives in New York City, insisted that I do the shopping instead of my parents, since their age puts them at a higher risk of complications from COVID-19.