Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR | Stop Cornell’s Reactivation

I request that President Pollack and the Board of Trustees begin working on a new plan to ensure students, staff, faculty and every other member of the Cornell community can participate in Cornell’s educational services from the safety of their homes or in safe homes that Cornell will provide for them locally or abroad.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Dear Cornell, Protect Your Grad Students

These issues are complicated, but the solution is straightforward: Cornell University should implement a non-medicalized process where graduate students can apply confidentially to work and teach remotely without needing to provide documentation. Those who choose to seek these accommodations are doing so to protect their health and safety and those of their loved ones.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: The Cornell Progressives Endorse

To the Editor: 

Ahead of the New York Congressional and State Assembly primaries on June 23, Cornell Progressives is proud to endorse the following candidates: Jamaal Bowman, Mel Gagarin, Lauren Ashcraft, and Anna Kelles. Cornell Progressives — formerly Cornell for Bernie — has decided to continue the ongoing mission of the Bernie 2020 campaign by actively supporting candidates who relay a similar vision of economic and social justice. Although we recognize that electoral politics is limited in its ability to fully combat the America’s long standing systemic inequalities, we are still vested in finding leadership that is willing to fight for the people. Our organization has hosted the aforementioned individuals for virtual panels in which our members could engage with each candidate, and, after a unanimous vote, we are happy to publicly support them in the upcoming elections. Our first endorsement goes to Melquiades “Mel” Gagarin, who is running in the Democratic primary for New York’s 6th Congressional District.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Cornell Law Clinical Faculty Respond to Racism and Police Violence

To the Editor:

As individuals and as professors, we oppose racism in all its forms. We are outraged by the murders of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, and by the killings of countless other Black people who have lost their lives as a result of racialized violence. We are also outraged by commentators, some of them attached to Ivy League Institutions, who are leading a smear campaign against Black Lives Matter. In describing the protests, they deliberately use terms like “wilding,” a racially loaded term coined in 1989 to describe the imagined actions of five innocent Black teenagers (Korey Wise, Kevin Richardson, Raymond Santana, Antron McCray and Yusef Salaam) who were wrongly convicted and sentenced to lengthy prison terms for the assault of a White jogger. These commentators express rage over the sporadic looting that has taken place amidst the largely peaceful protests, calling for organized manhunts to track down those responsible. Theirs is a form of racism that gives cover to those police who use their batons and tear gas and rubber bullets and fists to silence and maim their critics.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Re: ‘The Reason for Our Silence’

To the Editor:

On Saturday, the executive board of the Cornell Republicans published a response to a column written by Andrew Lorenzen ’22 a day prior, which criticized the group’s lack of response in the wake of the murder of George Floyd. In light of the recent Black Lives Matter protests that have gripped America’s largest cities and brought issues of police brutality and racial injustice to the forefront of the media once again, we found in the group’s response little more than a vapid attempt to legitimize their continued inaction. We call here for the Cornell Republicans to publicly acknowledge that Black lives matter, and, in doing so, affirm the existence of systemic racism, institutional oppression and widespread racist police brutality. In their response meant “to set the record straight” on past silence, the Cornell Republicans reasoned that “an expression of discontent with current popular opinions, such as defunding police departments” would cause unrest in the campus political climate. However, the Cornell Republicans have previously not shied away from entertaining potentially contentious discussions – however unpopular – with little regard for the impacts they may have on campus climate.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Re: ‘Supporting Jason Liefer for New York State Assembly’

To the Editor:

I encourage my neighbors and all voters in the 125th to choose Jason Leifer for State Assembly in the election June 23. We have plenty of credible candidates running, but Jason has accomplished some amazing things. He was the Dryden town board member who advocated using zoning and local control to ban fracking, a decision that was the beginning of the end of fracking in New York State. He has fought corporate control from Anschutz Exploration to Spectrum, deciding that his town would make its own decisions on what to allow and whom to serve — first by banning fracking and now by exploring municipal broadband. As town supervisor, he fought for community solar, and for the past several years he has required all new developments to use green building techniques.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: The Reason for Our Silence

To the Editor:

The Cornell Republicans executive board has been pained and anguished by the unjust killing of George Floyd. His death, the latest in a long series of injustices, has brought to the fore critical, and painful, conversations about police brutality and race. As the leadership of the Republican Party at Cornell, we have witnessed the intense discussion, action and outrage this tragedy has provoked. Realizing, however, that our positions might not align fully with those which have received widespread approval, we chose to take the present moment as one in which we would listen and reflect. While there are of course several policy measures we support, such as prohibiting chokeholds and reforming police unions, we thought it better to take this moment of national pain for reflection on how we can better live up to our founding ideals.