Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: In defense of the Elections Committee

To the Editor:

I stand in solidarity with the response of Travis Cabbell ’18. In response to the defamatory accusations presented against me and the Elections Committee throughout the course of this past election cycle, I would like to share that the committee and I have held ourselves to the highest standards of ethics and equality. The Elections Committee strives to uphold the process that the Student Assembly has adopted to ensure the fairness and integrity of all elections for all positions. If the individuals in question, community members or Student Assembly members do not like the rules that have been placed before us, I encourage any and all of them to speak up and be active in the process to revise them. We were given a set of rules to interpret and some cases on which we had to decide, and throughout this entire process, as public servants of the system of shared governance at Cornell with nothing to gain, we have faced harsh public scrutiny that has made some kind individuals have to stress about one more unnecessary thing.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Re: ‘First Generation Student Union Calls on Cornell to Review Legacy Admissions Practice’

To the Editor:

Earlier this year, the Cornell First Generation Student Union signed onto a letter alongside first-gen, low-income student groups at 12 of our peer institutions. The letter called upon our respective university administrations to disclose and re-evaluate the purpose of legacy preferences in admissions decisions. A day after the #FullDisclosure campaign launched through an Associated Press press release and an article in The Atlantic, The Cornell Daily Sun reported on our decision to join the campaign. The article was solely based off the #FullDisclosure letter, and an interview with FGSU’s Co-President, Mayra Valadez ‘18 and another Cornell student who is a legacy. This letter aims to clarify and expand upon our arguments for re-evaluating legacy admissions that were not covered or covered sufficiently in the article.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Concerning the Sun’s mobile website

To the editor:
I frequently visit the Daily Sun’s website on my phone, as I do not use my computer often. As of this year, whenever I open an article on my phone’s browser, I soon get a pop up, likely a phishing scam, from a website claiming to be Amazon.com and that I have just won a prize. I assumed at first that this was a problem that only I had, but over the past months, dozens of my peers have told me that they have the same issue with the website. A close friend of mine told me that he emailed the editors at the paper about this situation and received no response. It seems unfortunate to me that one of the most prestigious college papers in the country is beset with the same basic tech woes as a low-end porn site.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: On Willard Straight Hall modifications

To the editor:

This past fall, maintenance and minor renovation projects were performed on parts of Willard Straight Hall, but especially in regards to the dining facilities within the building.  Unfortunately, one of the rather unpleasant side effects is the large, stainless steel vent that is currently in front of Willard Straight Hall, to the left of the main entrance that now blows exhaust, steam, and other pungent odors right in front of the building.  It’s a shame that such a beautiful building on campus now has both this ugly vent and the unpleasant smells that come with it, which leave such a bad impression on both students and visitors that pass through Ho Plaza or utilize the building. Hopefully, something can be done to either relocate the fan to the rear or side of the building or eliminate it all together. Anthony Gullo ’18

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Suggestions for the business dean search committee

To the Editor:

As jarred Cornellians across the globe felt in 2016, the formation of the University’s College of Business was characterized by haste, cryptic explanation, and — without exaggeration — heartbreak.  The pain of betrayal by a loved one does not diminish on its own, even with time. So it is with cautious optimism that I write: now can be a time of hope. With the sudden resignation of Dean Soumitra Dutta, perhaps the University can slow down, and throw open the shutters to sunshine and breeze. The next dean must do no less than: 1.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Re: ‘S.A. Presidential Candidates Promise Free Netflix Services, Improved Accountability’

Correction Appended. To the Editor:

On Friday, The Sun ran an article detailing the platform of Student Assembly executive vice president and presidential candidate Varun Devatha ’19, one of the points of which was an intent to provide students with “access to streaming services such as Netflix or Hulu.” Putting aside the ridiculous cost to students that implementing such a plan would entail and the redundancy of using allocated money to purchase thousands of subscriptions that students likely already have, I would like to ask Mr. Devatha a simple question: have you heard of Kanopy Streaming? It’s an online streaming service providing media ranging from entertainment to educational content and classic movies. Boasting an ever-expanding library as deep and rich as the streaming giants, Kanopy is available to students completely free through Cornell’s library website — all you have to do is sign in with your NetID! Why should Cornell students pay for a corporate streaming service when they already have access to a great one through the school?

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Against the Combination of Human Ecology and ILR

To the Editor:

To combine the College of Human Ecology and the School of Industrial and Labor Relations would be a grave error and cruel abuse of administrative power. Such a decision would wreak havoc on the lives of students and faculty associated with both colleges. Moreover, it would disservice Cornell University for decades to come. The decision to combine various disciplinary studies across the University in the interest of synergy — a buzzword used repeatedly in the recently released report by the Committee on Organizational Structures in the Social Sciences — is not novel. Several of the promises made in regard to this new merger between CHE and ILR are those same deliverables that were issued concerning the College of Business: the “potential to promote new collaborations, synergies, and cutting-edge research,” the “[expansion of] opportunities for undergraduate students,” and the combination of units that already shared similar missions and commitments.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR | In Support of More Blue Lights On and Near Campus

To the editor:

I remember, way back during my freshman orientation at the University of Connecticut in Storrs, how amazed I was by the campus’s blue light system. At the time I was fairly ignorant regarding the sexual assault woes that plague university campuses nationwide. Nevertheless, the idea that I could, from virtually any point on campus, have a straight line of sight to one, and sometimes two or three, blue light boxes inspired a strong sense of safety. It was admittedly also somewhat fun checking out how many blue lights I could see from different points on campus. Needless to say, I was a bit shocked when I came to Cornell two years later, as a junior transfer, and found that the blue lights on campus were, at best, scarce.

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LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Repeal the Second Amendment

To the Editor:

We the people made our Constitution and have the right to amend it. The Second Amendment, ratified in 1791, says: “A well regulated militia being necessary to a free State, the right of the People to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.”

Article V of the Constitution says in part: “The Congress, whenever two thirds of both Houses shall deem it necessary, shall propose Amendments to this Constitution, . . . which, .

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LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Students shouldn’t give up their right to use tobacco on campus

To the Editor:

Listen up Cornell students… did you hear that whooshing sound?  It was the sound of another one of your fundamental rights being flushed down the toilet. That’s right, the bureaucratic, administrative state known as Cornell is considering banning tobacco, if a campus-wide referendum passes. There are so many problems with the idea of banning tobacco, but, don’t be fooled, this is an issue that’s much bigger than tobacco.  I believe that our “deep state” (consciously or unconsciously) is using tobacco as a front to control more of our lives.