Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Re: ‘Curriculum Committee Bars Senior Lecturer From Teaching Course He Created’

To the Editor:

This summer, the well-renowned and much-loved water treatment course CEE 4540 was deliberately dismantled by the CEE Curriculum Committee and quietly replaced with a hastily assembled, entirely redefined course under the same number. For the last three months, our ad-hoc team of CEE 4540 supporters (155+ students, alumni and staff) has been questioning this decision. The Curriculum Committee has repeatedly dismissed and scolded us. It appears that the University approaches curriculum from a “parent knows best” mindset. At no point during curriculum review were students or alumni asked for direct input.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Cornell Dems E-Board: Register to Vote

To the Editor:

We’re sure you’ve heard it a million times before. We’re sure you’ve scrolled past a “register to vote” meme on Facebook or have swiped through a voter registration filter on Snapchat. But we’re not sure that the message has stuck with you. And we’re telling you here, student to student, Cornellian to Cornellian, friend to friend, to make sure it sticks. According to the Campus Vote Project, turnout among college students has reached record lows in recent years.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Re: ‘Rep. Tom Reed Offers Support to Conservatives’’

To the Editor:

I write as a retired English and history teacher to protest the use of the term “conservative” to describe the politics of the current Republican party in Matthew McGowen’s article about Representative Tom Reed’s recent visit with 12 campus Republicans. I also marvel that a presumably well-educated college student quoted in the article can question why he might experience some “social backlash” at Cornell wearing clothing bearing the name of a president who calls climate change a hoax, extols “pussy grabbing” on a campus (like all other college campuses) where sexual assault is a serious problem and refers to the nations of origin of many Cornell students as “shithole countries.”

I’d love to have any of the twelve students who met with Reed explain to me what any of the above characterizations have in common with political conservatism, and I suggest that all of these students, along with Matthew McGowen, ought to take a survey political science course while at Cornell. I must also add that it offers us “left-leaning Ithacans” some pleasure to learn that Reed’s visit attracted 12 twelve students on a campus of 24,123.  It looks like education might be working! Barbara Regenspan

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Register to vote by Oct. 12: it matters to your health

To the Editor:

These days, I find myself engaged in conversation, both inside and outside of the exam room, about the political process and its relevance to health and wellbeing. How can I get more involved in my community?  Is it possible for me to feel better connected to those around me, and to something with larger meaning in the world?  How do I make sure my voice is heard? Deep questions like these are bound to come up in the course of intensely pursuing study here at Cornell.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Re: ‘I Believe You, Brett Kavanaugh’

To the Editor:

A casual stroll through the government department reveals an environment exploding with stress. Some of this, such as the stress attributed to upcoming prelims, is justified. The stress surrounding the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh and subsequent allegations is wildly misplaced. Cornellians are rightfully distressed about the prospect that an abuser could sit on the court. However, we seem to be ignoring the disturbing and rapid decay of due process in the United States as a result of this debacle.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR | Re: Cornell Polo Coach Retires as University Vows to Investigate Misconduct Claims

To the Editor:

The article by Dylan McDevitt in September 13’s Sun is, in my opinion, unbalanced, gleefully disparaging and extremely disrespectful of Cornell’s winningest coach and his many successes. The fact that the article has nothing to say about the “misconduct investigation” suggests that the Athletics Department is thankfully handling its investigation following proper privacy protocols. With nothing new to say, the author of the article instead dredges up some truck driving issue from 10 years ago of which Coach Eldredge was cleared and an instance, also from ten years ago, for which Coach Eldredge apologized, where he was simply teaching sportsmanship and players how to be respectful of umpires no matter how inflammatory those umpires might be on a given day.  There is a reason the law has a principle called double jeopardy. Don’t conduct a trial by media for something the coach was cleared of ten years ago!

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Cornell’s anti-labor administration is the problem, not its much-needed student housing projects

A popular student meme circulated on Facebook mid-August mocked Cornell’s funding of “flashy construction projects” over “cheaper tuition,” perpetuating an inaccurate either/or understanding of the university’s budgeting decisions. While a recently finished $61 million glass-enclosed “humanities atrium” should perhaps raise eyebrows, Cornell’s mostly housing-centric construction projects should not. Increased enrollment has placed significant upward pressure on the local housing market, spurring necessary action by the university to expand options for student accommodations. What deserves student and community attention is the particular way in which the university has commissioned such necessary housing developments. It should first be mentioned that our nearly $7 billion dollar university boasts a tax-exempt status, allowing it to operate within this town at great expense to local taxpayers.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Prof. Caruth clarifies decision to sign letter re: NYU prof. found guilty of sexual harassment

To the Editor:

I have recently had meaningful discussions with several graduate students from Cornell, who have encouraged me to explain to others what I have said to them about the signing of the letter concerning Avital Ronell. I am grateful to these students for their willingness to speak and to listen and to allow me to do the same. I explained to them that, although I have offered to the Cornell students to speak to them either individually or, by anonymous request, as a group, I have previously been reluctant to issue a formal statement or be interviewed for a paper. This is because of the likelihood of distortion in these contexts and because of the tendency for explanations to appear to be excuses, or to appear as attempts to purify oneself by condemning others. Nonetheless, as the students have indicated to me, they found it helpful to hear some of the context for my signing (and that of others), so I am reiterating my comments here.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: On North Campus Residential Expansion energy and climate change impacts

To the Editor:

It’s critical to look at the energy/climate change issues of Cornell’s proposed North Campus Residential Expansion.  Municipal reviewers need better understanding of three issues. First, eliminating methane emissions is imperative in fighting climate change.  Cornell’s greenhouse gas survey found them to be almost three times as serious as all other emissions combined on campus. Nonetheless, they propose heating this project with natural gas, inherently causing serious upstream methane emissions.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Re: Nobody Remembers 9/11

I remember 9/11. I remember being picked up from my kindergarten class by my mother and ushered home as soon as possible to an apartment in disarray. My uncle died on 9/11, and I can promise you, I remember it. I understand the viewpoint from which Ms. Pinero approached her column, but I found the argument tasteless and misstated. I am not one to defend America in its exploits overseas and I agree that we have a lot of work to do on our international policies.