GUEST ROOM | Enduring Acknowledgement, Respect and Support for EARS

As a Cornell alumnus, it grieves me to hear that Empathy, Assistance and Referral Service will no longer offer peer counseling, given Cornell’s general liability insurance does not cover peer counseling. Although I graduated five years ago, I cannot imagine that the importance of empathetic listening and training has diminished, especially given the COVID pandemic. 

I first came to Cornell for the 2012 Revisit Weekend, in the shadow of a series of student deaths. The campus was subdued, with upperclassmen whispering furtively behind the excited faces of the admitted students. Black metal fences lined the bridges between North and Central campuses –– a brutal daily reminder of fragility of life and importance of mental health. I joined EARS as a freshman and ultimately became an EARS counselor and trainer.

GUEST ROOM | Give Thanks to Your Resident Hall Staffer

It is safe to say Cornellians limped to the finish line last semester. With fewer breaks, unusually substandard dining hall sustenance and a monumental Student Assembly calamity, things certainly went smoother than expected. 

Cornell’s expansive testing capabilities and containment of the virus even garnered national media attention. The COVID-19 response was managed so effectively, in fact, it received the highest honor given to an institution: a Good Morning America segment anchored by Robin Roberts, featuring reporter sidekick Tom Llamas. Folks, we’ve made it. Undoubtedly, the University deserves praise.

WATCH | Behind The Sun With Sidney Malia Waite

In the second episode of The Cornell Daily Sun’s Opinion Columnist Spotlight series, Catherine St. Hilaire ’22 talks to Sidney Malia Waite ’22 about her experience working on her column Waite, What?

GUEST ROOM | E is for Empathy: A Reintroduction to EARS

Last week, the University announced that Empathy, Assistance and Referral Service would no longer offer peer counseling, as this kind of service is not insured by the University. EARS, however, will still continue as an organization, though now without the peer counseling service that we are best known for. Confusion, outrage, disappointment and dozens of questions like “Why?” and “How?” and “How do we fix it?” spread over Zoom calls, Facebook posts and even Reddit threads after the news broke. These responses are understandable. After all, how do you reconcile a peer counseling organization with no peer counseling?

ONONYE | Happy Early International Women’s Day. Here’s How to be a Better Cornell Feminist

I know this is a week early, but considering that my column is titled Womansplaining, there is no way that I’d pass up on a chance to write a column about International Women’s Day ––and more broadly, Women’s History Month. This year’s United Nations’ theme for International Women’s Day is “Women in Leadership: Achieving an Equal Future in a COVID-19 World.” That is a long (and very important!) title, emphasizing the importance of elevating women into leadership positions amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. There is obviously no perfect feminist (contrary to my Instagram bio where I self proclaim myself the “professional feminist”) and no right way to advocate for women or gender justice. However, if you’re thinking about ways to be a gender advocate on campus this month, here are eight ways to be a “better” Cornell feminist. 

Take a class in feminist, gender and sexuality studies. 

If you’ve met me at any point in the last three years, you probably know my mantra: “Every person should have to take a feminist, gender and sexuality studies course on campus before they graduate.” Throughout my FGSS career, I have studied Beyonce’s impact on feminism, marital rape laws, the Disney princesses, Nigerian feminist poets, Greek life on college campuses and influencer culture. Every aspect of your life, past or present, has to do with gender.

WATCH | Behind the Sun With Paris Ghazi

In the first episode of Cornell Daily Sun’s new Opinion Columnist Spotlight series, Catherine St. Hilaire ’22 talks to Paris Ghazi ’21 about her experience working on her column “La Vie en Prose.”

SMITH | Feeling Sick During a Pandemic

Aside from the random “there was just something stuck in my throat” cough or the odd sneeze, I’ve been notably illness free… in the midst of a pandemic. I’m not alone. COVID-19 is affecting the cold and flu season, even if only temporarily. England released a communicable and respiratory disease report for 2020 that announced lower cases of common respiratory illnesses. Given COVID precautions, this makes sense.

In Photos: 2020, Reviewed

Photos at the start of 2020 mirrored previous years: crowded ClubFests, student activism, Ithaca weather and hockey games. But as a raging pandemic canceled events and closed campus, the photos depicted a shift in daily routines and customs that defined an unforgettable year. Here’s a look at 2020 — often called historic, unprecedented and one like no other — in photos.