Apple Should Not Follow FBI Request To Unlock iPhone, Says Prof

In a time when the boundaries of privacy are becoming unclear in technology, the verdicts from the ongoing battle between Apple and the FBI over a terrorist’s locked iPhone will change the field of encryption. A key player in this field is Prof. Stephen Wicker, electrical and computer engineering, who has spoken to Congress and the White House about privacy in today’s world. In this fight, he believes that Apple is correct. On Dec. 5,  Syed Rizwan Farook and Tashfeen Malik shot and killed 14 people in San Bernardino, California, before being killed themselves in the ensuing shootout with law enforcement.

SCHULMAN | Emotion is Simple, Technology Isn’t

It’s rare for technology to make front-page news. But this week, Apple has been making headlines. No, Apple’s quarterly earnings report isn’t being released. And no, the new iPhone isn’t coming out either. On the surface, the issue at hand is simple.

BERKOWITZ | The War We Are Now Seeing

Last semester, I wrote “The War We Are Not Seeing,” a column looking into the complex and unfolding standoff between technology companies and government officials over how to handle encryption for matters of national security. This week, the so-called “war we are not seeing” became very visible to the American public, so I think it’s important to revisit the subject. When we left off in the fall, my hope was that technology companies and federal investigators would work together to achieve a satisfactory balance of privacy rights and national security interests. So much for cooperation. On Tuesday, U.S. Magistrate Judge Judge Sheri Pym ordered Apple to comply with the FBI to help unlock an iPhone involved in the San Bernardino terrorist investigation.

AppleFest: Ithaca’s Thirty-Third Annual Apple Harvest Festival

Elizabeth Gorman ’18 went into AppleFest weekend with goals: to go all three days and try every apple-esque product available. Sample every apple variety I could sink my teeth into. Turn into an apple. Although I didn’t actually achieve any of these ambitious goals, she discovers why she loves AppleFest so much.

Trapping the Snow Leopard

The OS War between Microsoft and Apple has been going on since the release of the Macintosh in 1984.

As we approach closer to present day, the release of Mac OS X in 2001 completely changed the playing field. 2009 is looking to be a turning point for both operating systems with Microsoft slated to release Windows 7 in October and Apple releasing OS X Snow Leopard on August 30. Both systems boast better performances, and seeing as I’ve already turned my skeptical eye to Windows 7 in a previous blog, I feel that it’s Apple’s turn on the chopping block.

Apple's Headphone Ploy

Being a Mac user, I’m bombarded with the inane advertisement that is the Safari home page whenever I start up my browser. Surprisingly, I can’t believe that I’ve JUST seen the ad for the new iPod shuffle. Aside from VoiceOver, which (l) allows the iPod to announce things to you, such as playlist title, song name, etc., the other feature that caught my attention about the shuffle was the placement of the controls on the right earbud.

Hold on, something’s not right. The controls are on the earbud?

Another brick in the wall

The new aluminum MacBook, released in October, was known as the “brick” before release due to its new single-piece construction method. The notebook’s body is built by carving out pieces from a single brick of aluminum.

All in the family

Apple’s new iPod lineup. From left to right, the iPod touch, iPod classic, iPod nano, and iPod shuffle.