Hound and Mare Reinvigorates Ithaca’s Breakfast Scene

Located in the Ithaca Commons on Aurora St., Hound and Mare is a new local cafe and bakery that offers a plethora of choices ranging from house-made pastries and coffee to famous bagel sandwiches. When I first walked through the door, I was immediately overwhelmed by the smell of fresh baked goods. The store was playing soft jazz music, which perfectly matched the classic interior with brick walls and wide windows. Each table was spread 6 feet apart and had mini bottles of sanitizer on them. With its cozy interior and COVID safe environment, I instantly felt at ease and comforted by the store’s atmosphere.  

With a minimalist yet intriguing and creative menu, I took my time viewing the different bagel sandwich options.

But First, Breakfast: Trying the New and Improved Suna Breakfast

The next morning, I rolled out of bed and awaited a text message from Suna. Sure enough, a text came precisely at the beginning of the 10-minute delivery window notifying me that my order was ready! All I had to do was step outside of my dorm building to retrieve it. As someone whose breakfast typically consists of scarfing down overnight oats or eating a sugary muffin from a campus eatery, getting a beautifully packaged breakfast delivered directly to me felt uber-luxurious. I was already giddy about Suna’s seamless delivery process, so could hardly wait to dig in and try what I ordered.

An Ode to Protein: “thank u, eggs”

Just as Ariana lists Big Sean, Ricky Alvarez, Mac Miller and Pete Davidson as her formative exes, I see omelettes (“one taught me love”), scrambled eggs (“one taught me patience”), poached eggs and rolled omelettes as milestones in my progress as a cook.

Ode to Trumansburg

Next time you have a hankering to get out of Ithaca, drive yourself up to Trumansburg and eat breakfast with Charlie — or just ask to use the bathroom (it was just as adorable as the café and worth the drive).

Tasty Video Renditions

While scrolling aimlessly through Facebook feeds during 75-minute lectures, you’ve probably come across a Tasty video or two — yes, the beautiful time lapse masterpieces that condense the amount of time it would take to cook a full meal into a 30-second clip. From savory slow cooked ribs to sweet cake pops, these short videos whet any appetite. Onions appear to caramelize instantly; wet and dry ingredients form dough in just a second. Whether an aspiring chef, packaged ramen-making master or just a dining-hall-reliant student, these videos give the impression that anyone could make a delicious dish with almost no effort. After watching and watching these videos every day in lecture, I was inspired.