Demonstrators listen to a keynote speaker at Ithaca's March for Science.

Hundreds Participate in Ithaca’s March for Science

For some, science is more than a lifelong passion or a suitable career path: it’s the difference between life and death. Carrie Lazarre, a Tompkins County resident who has been suffering from stage IV colon cancer for the past decade, says that sustained colon cancer research has been crucial in keeping her alive all these years. Along with hundreds of others, Lazarre chose to participate in the March for Science at the Bernie Milton Pavilion on Ithaca Commons on April 22 to showcase the importance of science for everyday Americans. The march was part of a larger endeavor across the United States and the world to stand up for science research, funding and policy. The main event, which attracted approximately 40,000 people, took place in Washington D.C., with satellite marches in around 500 locations across the United States.

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Cornell Researchers to Head Center on the Physics of Cancer Metabolism

Grim statistics reveal just how debilitating breast cancer can be. According to the American Cancer Society, over 230,000 women were diagnosed with the disease in the United States in 2013. Forty thousand of these cases were incurable. There is good news, however. Over the past 20 years, advancements in the disease’s treatment have been consistent.