Demonstrators listen to a keynote speaker at Ithaca's March for Science.

Hundreds Participate in Ithaca’s March for Science

For some, science is more than a lifelong passion or a suitable career path: it’s the difference between life and death. Carrie Lazarre, a Tompkins County resident who has been suffering from stage IV colon cancer for the past decade, says that sustained colon cancer research has been crucial in keeping her alive all these years. Along with hundreds of others, Lazarre chose to participate in the March for Science at the Bernie Milton Pavilion on Ithaca Commons on April 22 to showcase the importance of science for everyday Americans. The march was part of a larger endeavor across the United States and the world to stand up for science research, funding and policy. The main event, which attracted approximately 40,000 people, took place in Washington D.C., with satellite marches in around 500 locations across the United States.

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Cornell Researchers to Head Center on the Physics of Cancer Metabolism

Grim statistics reveal just how debilitating breast cancer can be. According to the American Cancer Society, over 230,000 women were diagnosed with the disease in the United States in 2013. Forty thousand of these cases were incurable. There is good news, however. Over the past 20 years, advancements in the disease’s treatment have been consistent.

COURTESY OF FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES

Just Dying to See It: Me and Earl and the Dying Girl

Based on the debut novel of writer Jesse Andrews, Me and Earl and the Dying Girl is endearing with its painfully suburban but quirky setting, wide range of eccentric characters and first-person narration by our main character, Greg Gaines (Thomas Mann). From the get go, his character is swiftly established with his first line: “This is the story of my senior year of high school. How I almost destroyed my life and made a film so bad it literally killed someone.”

Following the high-school filmmaking duo Greg and Earl (RJ Cyler) through their “doomed” friendship with Rachel Kushner (Olivia Cooke), a classmate who’s been recently diagnosed with leukemia, the movie seems to contain the makings of a perfectly mawkish tale, set to induce tears and follow every cliché that might spring from such a relationship. It is very clearly a coming of age film, generally filled with the suburban strife of coming to grips with life and responsibility. As such, its plot isn’t so innovative or fascinating: A white boy in suburbs grows up (or makes a butchered attempt to).

BERKOWITZ | The Gilded Age of the NFL

By ETHAN BERKOWITZ
“Football and community are the twin pillars of the NFL … There exists a powerful NFL-wide commitment to giving back. This commitment is year-round- there is no offseason to the NFL’s multi-tiered, ongoing work to strengthen America’s communities.” This is the NFL’s official stance on their role in the community. Clearly the NFL can talk the talk, but do they walk the walk? While the NFL claims to take a prominent role in bettering the community on a range of social issues, critics have argued that the NFL simply takes advantage of cause-based marketing such as their A Crucial Catch campaign to overshadow bad publicity, to generate public good will or simply to attract new fans and thereby more revenue.

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Cornell Undergraduate Research Board Hosts Fifth Annual Fall Forum

On Nov. 4, more than 50 student presenters and 300 onlookers filled into the Physical Sciences Building’s Clark Atrium for the Cornell Undergraduate Research Board’s Fall Forum, sharing student research being performed on all corners of campus. This year’s event was the fifth ever and had one the largest turnouts yet, according to Jimmy Guo ’16, co-president of CURB. “We started the Fall Forum five years ago, as we saw that many students who conducted research over summer needed an outlet to share their work on campus,” Guo said. “It started off fairly small, but we’ve since grown it to be our second largest annual event.”

Research subjects spanned across several colleges and majors, and students of various class years presented.