Contribution From Cornell Prof. Catalyzes the Nobel Prize in Chemistry

The 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to David MacMillan and Benjamin List, who are credited for developing asymmetric organocatalysis — a way of catalyzing reactions using organic molecules to form specific copies of a compound. This tool increases the capabilities of medicinal chemistry. MacMillan and List, director at the Max Planck Institute for Coal Research, came across the concept simultaneously yet an ocean apart in the late 1990s. 

GUEST ROOM | Friends and Colleagues Say Goodbye to Thomas Ruttledge

Dr. Thomas Ruttledge died on Tuesday while out on one of his famous bike rides. Tom discovered his love for chemistry while an undergraduate at Wayne State University. He wrote his thesis on pathogen interactions in plants with David Lynn at the University of Chicago and later came to Cornell University as a post-doctoral associate.  He taught at Earlham, Whitman and Ursinsus Colleges before coming to Cornell a little less than twenty years ago. Here he taught some of our largest organic chemistry classes, and the more general Language of Chemistry class.  Through the Cornell HHMI Accelerating Medical Progress Through Scholarship and Douglas programs, he was active in the underrepresented minority STEM education work of the chemistry department. Tom Ruttledge had been teaching Chem 2510, 1150 and 3010 for so many years that, until his recent heart problems, it is difficult to remember another professor teaching any of those classes.

Cornell Lab Discovers New Regulatory Mechanism of Protein, Sheds Light on Importance of Cornell’s High Energy Synchrotron Source

Proteins are strikingly complex macromolecules, which control every aspect of molecular function in all living organisms, making them an interesting research target. The Ando Lab studies the structure of proteins, specifically enzymes, in order to understand their function, using structural techniques like x-ray diffraction and small-angle x-ray scattering. These techniques allow for the visualization of atomic and molecular structure of proteins. Small-angle x-ray scattering is a technique used to study the structure of proteins in solution. SAXS maintains an advantage over other techniques because it allows for the understanding of the movement of proteins; however a caveat to SAXS is its lower resolution, creating the need for combinatorial approaches to studying proteins such as combining SAXS with chromatography.

Nobel Prize Winning Technology Demonstrates Merits of Interdisciplinary Collaboration, says Cornell Prof

Why are the most fundamental structural parts of the human body referred to as cells? Robert Hooke, the man who coined the term, thought they looked like cells in a monastery. But without a picture, this analogy would never have been possible. Microscopes, the fundamental instruments that make these pictures possible have gone a long way from 1665, when Hooke made his discoveries. Hooke looked at dead cells while today, we freeze biochemicals to view metabolic processes as they happen.