Mortal Kombat Gets the “R” It Deserves

This is not the first, or even the second, Mortal Kombat film. Over two decades ago, two separate live action Mortal Kombat films were released. The second was a major critical and commercial flop (leading to a twenty-four year pause before they tried again), but the first was an unexpected success. 1995’s Mortal Kombat is still widely embraced by fans and has solidified itself as an essential nineties-cheese cult classic. However, despite how fun the original Mortal Kombat was and still is, it lacked the defining aspect that, to many fans, defines Mortal Kombat: gore.

Five (or, six) Cornellians Set to Serve in 117th Congress

Five Cornell alumni — all incumbents — were called the winners to serve in the 117th United States Congress. Six alumni lost their House races on Tuesday, with one remaining race too close to call at time of publication.

As Senate Tries Trump, Professors Predict Impeachment Outcomes

As the impeachment of President Donald Trump moves to trial in the Senate, Cornell professors shared their views on the significance of the House charges –– and their predictions for how America’s historic impeachment trial will play out. On Tuesday afternoon, as the Senate began trial proceedings, bitter partisanship was on full display, with Senators sticking to party-lines in several key votes, The New York Times reported. By the end of Tuesday night, multiple attempts by Senate Democrats to subpoena documents from the White House had failed –– reflecting a so far intense battle on what process the impeachment trial will follow. While Democratic leaders in the chamber have insisted that additional witnesses and evidence be subpoenaed by the Senate, many Republicans have resisted such plans. “If witnesses are, in fact, called, they might have some very significant things to say, and the trial would be much longer,” Prof. Richard Bensel, government, said in an email to The Sun, who said that House Democrats’ decision to impeach Trump was the “one ethical choice.”

However, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-K.Y.) has thus far stuck to a limit on the time for arguments: three days.