Pg-1-Mitrano-by-Boris-Tsang

Tracy Mitrano J.D. ’95 Announces Rematch Against Rep. Tom Reed

After a disappointing loss in the midterm election last year to four-time incumbent Rep. Tom Reed (R-N.Y.) for New York’s 23rd Congressional District seat, Tracy Mitrano J.D. ’95 is back and ready to launch a second attempt to win the district. “I’m running again because I love this region. I love the beauty of the land and of the passion, power, and resiliency of the people,” Mitrano said in a statement to The Sun. Mitrano, a graduate of Cornell Law School, has been buoyed by widespread Democratic Party support. She has already achieved the endorsements of several county committees, as reported by the Ithaca Journal, making a primary challenger less likely.

Picture1

GROSKAUFMANIS | Actions Speak Louder Than Wardrobes

Today’s cover of the New Yorker shows Barry Blitt’s “Welcome to Congress,” a moving visual tribute to the historic number of women who have been elected to serve in the Congress. The cartoon features figures that appear to be Sharice Davids J.D. ’10, one of the first female Native Americans elected to Congress and the first openly LGBTQ representative elected from Kansas, Ilhan Omar, one of the first Muslim women elected to Congress, and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who at 29 is the youngest woman to ever be elected to Congress. By now most of us have heard these names and registered these accomplishments, but the New Yorker cover really communicates how this election cycle was a monumental deviation from the status quo. However, an obvious consequence of change is pushback, and not all media has been as welcoming to this group of trailblazers. Last week, the internet erupted into controversy over, of all things, Ocasio-Cortez’s wardrobe — which is a really disappointing sentence to be typing in 2018.

Picture1

VALDETARO | Let D.C. (Yes, D.C.) Vote

Growing up just outside of Washington, D.C., I had ample interaction with the federal government. My dad worked for a government contractor, the parents and neighbors of friends were government employees and officials of all levels of importance and, most importantly, the daily mass migration of federal workers from their jobs often left me stuck on gridlocked roads between about 4:30 and 7:00 p.m. To this day, when I meet somebody from outside the area I grew up in, I introduce myself as being from D.C., because it often feels like I am just as much a part of what happens in D.C. as are those who actually live there. In every way but one, this is categorically false; the speed with which I take back this claim when I mistakenly make it to an actual resident of the District is evidence enough of that. And yet, I, along with every other resident of Virginia, Maryland and the other 48 states in the union, have one thing that those who live in the capital do not: representation in the government that sits there. Residents of D.C. have no voting representation in Congress, despite taking in those which the rest of the country seems to collectively loathe and then having to be under more direct control of those 535 people than any other municipality.