Food Ethics | The Third Saturday

The local restaurant in Pennsylvania where I worked was easily defined by seasons. The year started off in a barren winter. The garden beds out front were hugged in snow, the thermostat dropped low and customers, especially after a holiday shopping spree, were scarce. I’d find myself staring at the clock, willing it to chime closing time, 2:00 p.m. Winters were scarce of many things: Fresh food, warmth, entertainment, customers and, most importantly, tips. I never liked winters in the restaurant very much.

Student Spotlight on Melissa Page ’20: Researching an Optimal Response to Allergies

Corrections appended. There are few things that can put a damper on an end of summer evening in upstate New York, but allergies are one of them. The classic watery eyes, incessant sneezing, and insatiable back of throat itch one feels while relaxing on Libe Slope or hiking to Second Dam can be attributed to little molecules called allergens, and our bodies response to them. Yet pollen isn’t the only thing that can send one running for a tissue or bathroom. Many compounds in the environment including plants, food and insect product can cause full scale immunological responses and Melissa Page ’20 has set out to better understand why.

GUEST ROOM | Air Bud as Embodiment of Corporate Capitalist Dogma

What is more emblematic of the United States’ corporate capitalist narrative than Air Bud? A well-groomed, intelligent Golden Retriever frees himself from an abusive owner to provide both athletic success and companionship to a fatherless boy. Yet, as Air Bud nears its 20th anniversary in a year and change, it is imperative to reconsider this touchstone family film. Is Air Bud a story of basketball glory and family cohesion, of friendship between human and other animal, or is it truly a parable of an oppressive corporate system cloaking the workers’ alientation in false empathy? Buddy, the film’s protagonist, represents the indoctrinated masses.

Students Live With Their Dogs, Despite Rules, Challenges

Whether fetching tennis balls on the Arts Quad, strolling down the streets of Collegetown or laying beside the gorges, canines have become a noticeable part of campus life. But who takes care of these dogs? Where do they live? And what happens to them after their owners graduate?
One dog, Meeko, lives with his owner Tom Hudson ’11 and several of his fraternity brothers.
“Two of us originally planned to take care of him, but then more people just got involved and helped taking him for walks,” Hudson said. “Meeko lives in a house with all the other brothers, we’ve had some trouble training him, but he’s a really sociable dog.”