Karsten Moran / The New York Times

Food Ethics | Ethiopian Avocados

During my six-month sojourn in Ethiopia, I had the joy of working with an nongovernmental organization (NGO) by the name of the Ethiopian Education Foundation and living in the capital city of Addis Ababa. Every morning at 7 a.m., the managers and I maneuvered around the hostel making sure our students were prepared for class; breakfast, consisting of bread and bananas, was eaten and the usual suspects attempting to play hooky were dealt with. After a chaotic morning of fifty students eating, clamoring and readying themselves for class, I was free. The students left by 7:40 a.m. and I was out the door by 7:41. I twisted and twirled down the unpaved streets of the residential neighborhood surrounding our hostel.

Ben Parker / Sun Assistant Photography Editor

Food Ethics | Medicine for the Lonely

While walking up the stairs in my house, I saw my brother Mike’s door was propped open. I popped my head in to see how he was doing. Talking with him, we happened upon the topic of illness. “My throat has been so sore that it hurts even to swallow. I wouldn’t mind the cough otherwise.”

Well, I had a solution for that!

Kathryn Stamm / Sun News Editor

If I am Drinking Straight from the Tap, Those Microbes are Drinking from the Tap

For the first time that day, I scuttled down the few steps outside of my apartment building. It was already 2:00 p.m., and I took the opportunity to stretch my arms and move my body. A typical April day in quarantined upstate New York, mid-forties and cloudy with sporadic rain showers. I took a seat on a wooden bench on the sidewalk. With the corner of my eye, I spotted a jar hugging the leg of the bench.

Tulips at the Keukenhof garden's annual exhibit of bulbs in Lisse, Netherlands.

Food Ethics | The Third Saturday

The local restaurant in Pennsylvania where I worked was easily defined by seasons. The year started off in a barren winter. The garden beds out front were hugged in snow, the thermostat dropped low and customers, especially after a holiday shopping spree, were scarce. I’d find myself staring at the clock, willing it to chime closing time, 2:00 p.m. Winters were scarce of many things: Fresh food, warmth, entertainment, customers and, most importantly, tips. I never liked winters in the restaurant very much.

Kathryn_Stamm_News_Editor

Food Ethics | A Jam in March

Like everyone else right now, I’ve been partially stuck inside practicing social distancing as part of our society’s duty to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. I say “partially” because luckily one can also socially distance while spending time outdoors, and Ithaca is the perfect place. After all, why not use this opportunity to explore the beautiful area surrounding Cornell and hike some new trails? On quite a few trails during my recent hikes in various nature preserves, I’ve noticed square or rectangular indentations in the ground nearby, sometimes lined with stone. Over a hundred years ago, these earthen depressions were the cellars of houses that are now long gone.

Maca drinks for sale at a market in Arequipa, Peru.

Food Ethics | Growing Up With Chicha de Jora

I ran behind my mother as she walked toward the front door. I followed her knowing she was headed to the market. She looked back at me and smiled; she knew I never missed Saturday grocery shopping. She held my hand tight as I jumped around, the sun guiding our path to the market. As we stepped on rocks to cross the train rails, I finally saw the women selling chicha morada (sweet purple corn drink) by the entrance.

Margaritas (Ben Parker/Sun Assistant Photography Editor)

Food Ethics | To Make Margaritas

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To make margaritas, you need lime juice, and a lot of it. Limes are not native to central New York, so I knew this would constitute the greatest sacrifice of food miles. However, due to our special occasion, I decided it was a worthwhile sacrifice. Isaac is Mexican and missing home, so I hoped this would bring him joy. As we were both very hungry, Isaac offered to help me juice the limes.

Meditation Mount, a tranquil spot that includes hiking paths, gardens and scenic mountaintop views, in the Ventura County town of Ojai, Calif., Feb. 25, 2020. (Beth Coller/The New York Times)

Food Ethics | Zen Instructions on How to Treat Your Eyeballs

I watched in horror as the half cup of uncooked Jasmine rice slipped from my hands and scattered across the carpet floor. The metal measuring cup ricocheted off the ground, projecting rice in every which way. This was my first attempt to prepare a Zen cuisine meal and, from a Zen perspective, I was having an abysmal start. My mind raced to my closet where my vacuum sat waiting and without hesitation my legs meandered to the corner. It was the quick and effortless solution.

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Food Ethics | Worries to Wonder

When I was 14 years old, I went hunting with my dad on youth hunting weekend. It’s the weekend before the official hunting season begins, giving novice hunters a better chance. Going into this, I asked two questions: ‘do I deserve to eat meat if I can’t kill an animal? ,’ and, more importantly, ‘how will I feel after this?’ The best way to find out seemed to be to shoot first and ask questions later. I was even planning on butchering the animal myself, which I felt was a crucial step in answering these questions.

Interview with Benjamin Velani ’22

From investigating the changing bar culture to growing his own produce, Benjamin Velani ’22, The Sun’s dining editor, can always be counted on for food tips and advice! He shares what else the dining department has in store for readers — stay tuned and get excited!