What’s Here 2Stay?

After a 3-month hiatus, Collegetown’s most exciting new restaurant returned with a bang. Student marketers hummed around Collegetown, shouting down would-be customers and zealously offering free samples to whoever stopped for more than a second. The boisterous atmosphere continued inside. The shop itself was buzzing with activity: Music blaring, employees lively and smiling — practically a party in the store. In spite of the theatrics, the online order was right on time, and after a short sojourn I was ready to bring to you a comprehensive review of (nearly) every item on 2Stay 2Go’s online menu.

Food Cultural Appropriation: It’s Personal

I am first generation Chinese-Vietnamese. Both of my parents immigrated to the United States as a result of the Vietnam War. My closest connection to my Vietnamese culture, like many children of immigrants, is food. Food is part of my identity. Food is personal. 

Unfortunately, many Asian Americans remember childhood experiences of feeling ashamed after being told that their food was gross or that it smelled weird.

Ithaca Ghost Kitchen: A Pandemic Restaurant Done Right

One of Ithaca’s newest restaurants, the Ghost Kitchen, serves an eclectic array of items from deep dish pizza to wholesome juices. Standing out for it’s COVID-friendly business model of curbside or delivery only, Ghost Kitchen also offers college-student friendly prices for quality food.

Who Belongs in the Kitchen?

Picture a celebrity chef — someone you always saw on your television screen growing up. You might think of a competition show host or the head chef at your city’s fanciest restaurant. Do you have them in your mind? Ready? Are they a man? 

Now think about your favorite meal growing up.

CHANG | Finding Food in the Desert

Finding healthful food while living off-campus is the second most difficult task to do as a Cornellian — only passing “Introduction to Wines” is harder. We need creative solutions from the University and the municipal government to help encourage healthier eating habits in Ithaca’s food desert. It might surprise you that much of Ithaca is actually part of a food desert, according to the USDA’s definition. In an urban area — I know, it might be a bit rich to call Ithaca urban, although it’s also not exactly rural — a food desert requires the absence of a full-service grocery store in a one-mile radius. Much of the northwest and southern areas of the 14850 zip code area fit this definition.

AUSTIN | It’s a Crisp! It’s a Cobbler! It’s a Crispler!

I’ve always loved the phrase “old soul”; it brings to mind an image of a very whimsical creature — one untouched by the mundanities of life. It tends not to describe an early bedtime, insomnia or creaky joints. Unfortunately, the only reason someone would ever refer to me as an “old soul” is if they were referring to my 10 p.m. bedtime. 

This is why I’m completely baffled as to why I thought it was a good idea to start baking a Moosewood recipe at 11 p.m. At 11:30 p.m., as I awaited my Blueberry Cobbler’s exit from the oven, I fought to keep my eyes open in an effort to not burn my house down. 

As I progress through this Moosewood journey, it is becoming harder and harder to choose a recipe every week. Because I prefer baking to cooking, I’ve been disproportionately relying on the Moosewood Restaurant Book of Desserts for my weekly “experiment.” Sadly, I’m a college student on a budget and don’t have the funds (nor the justification) to pay for an ingredient that I’ll only use once.

Cornell Dining Returns This Spring With New Menus, Critics

As students ease into spring semester, Cornell Dining has scrapped its monotonous menus from the fall in favor of redesigning food options and the dining experience. 

After a rocky fall semester, where Cornell Dining made sweeping adjustments to maintain COVID-19 safety, students complained of repetitive menus such as Taco Tuesday and a never-ending rotation of French toast sticks, pancakes and tater tots for breakfast. Students also complained of long wait times — some of which eclipsed 30 minutes. 

In response, Cornell Dining’s chefs and staff reevaluated and expanded their operations. 

North and West Campus dining halls have brought back specialty stations, including grills and pasta bars. Spring menus will also include new specialties, with dining halls offering diverse cuisines from North Africa and the Caribbean in addition to themed holiday dinners. 

Dining hall “chef dinners,” where chefs create their own specialty dishes, will return to West Campus, while seasonal specials will return on Wednesdays to North Campus. Matt Warren ’24, said these changes have created more well-rounded and diverse dining options, which have significantly improved the student experience. 

“It’s gotten better,” Warren said. “They don’t serve green beans at every meal, and they have a wider variety of ethnic options.

Food Stamps: On the Ballot and On Campus

More often than not, I find that discussions of food insecurity that occur on campus focus almost exclusively on off-campus communities. We discuss in depth data regarding Ithaca, Tompkins County and the nation as a whole. We discuss the implications of the recent election on food insecurity and access to food stamps without acknowledging the peers in class next to us that rely on these same assistance programs.

Many low-income college students were among the nearly 700,000 people projected to lose their SNAP benefits as a result of the new work requirements announced nearly a year ago by the Trump administration. This rule explicitly targets “able-bodied adults without dependents,” a category most college students fit into. As a population that is already purposely excluded from receiving SNAP benefits in a wide variety of cases, this rule, if enacted, could further stymie the access of college students to a well-needed resource.

A Guide to the Best Hangover Food at Terrace

Cornell can be a cold and hard place. The brutal Ithaca weather combined with equally tough classes can often push some Cornellians to clear their minds through less school sanctioned methods. Imagine this. After finishing an especially tough prelim or paper in the middle of your week, the only thing you want to do is forget about it. As you scroll through Netflix for the most mind-numbing show available, your friend bursts through the door and hands you a drink.

Food Stamps on the Ballot: What Does This Election Mean for Those Facing Food Insecurity During the Pandemic?

As the U.S. faces a third wave of coronavirus cases and some cities and states prepare for another round of shutdowns, thousands of households are continuing to face economic hardship and food insecurity. Earlier this year, the Trump administration finalized a proposed rule change that would have blocked nearly 700,000 people from getting essential food assistance, one of three of the administration’s efforts to overhaul the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). 
The new rule would have affected the eligibility criteria for able-bodied adults with no dependents, limiting states’ ability to waive existing work mandates and requiring individuals to be employed to receive benefits. It was struck down last week by a federal judge after Pennsylvania and California residents sued Trump’s Agricultural Department. Critics say that this proposal is yet another attempt by the Trump administration to continue its deregulatory war on existing safety net programs, even as businesses struggle and the number of newly unemployed households remains high as a result of the pandemic. “The Final Rule at issue in this litigation radically and abruptly alters decades of regulatory practice, leaving States scrambling and exponentially increasing food insecurity for tens of thousands of Americans,” explained D.C Chief U.S. District Judge Beryl A. Howell, in a 67-page opinion.