Cornell One of Seven Institutions Awarded NIH Grant to Strengthen Faculty Diversity

After a competitive application process, Cornell is one of seven institutions awarded $16 million as part of the inaugural Faculty Institutional Recruitment for Sustainable Transformation Grant by the National Institutes of Health. Vice Provost for Academic Affairs and Prof. Avery August, microbiology and immunology, received the grant to hire and support faculty who diversify biomedical and health researchers at Cornell.

Cornell Program in Infrastructure Policy Receives $1.5 Million Grant from Koch Foundation

The Cornell Program in Infrastructure Policy — a seven-year-old program that tackles the ins and outs of infrastructure — just got a big boost with a $1.5 million grant from the Charles Koch Foundation. This program focuses on “improving the delivery, maintenance, and operation of physical infrastructure,” according to its website. Based in the College of Human Ecology, the program funds research about infrastructure, hosts events to discuss important issues in the field and maintains an advisory board of experts in both public and private industries to help carry out the goals of the organization. According to Prof. Rick Geddes, policy analysis and management, the founding director of CPIP, these goals are to “further research, teaching, public engagement, and outreach in the area of infrastructure policy.”

One of the goals of the program will be “to research technology and infrastructure,” specifically the adoption and implementation of these programs in cities and counties, according to Geddes. Geddes pointed out the immense technological advancements that infrastructure is currently undergoing.

Cornell Prof. Suzanne Mettler Awarded Prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship

Prof. Suzanne Mettler Ph.D. ’94, the John L. Senior Professor of American Institutions in the Department of Government —  and a leading scholar in American political institutions — was among 167 scholars, artists and scientists awarded a fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation on April 16. The Guggenheim Fellowship program is intended to help scholars work with as much creative freedom as possible. This year roughly 3,000 people applied. It provides grants to selected individuals for six to twelve months of time, which they can spend in any matter they deem necessary to their research. Since its establishment in 1925 to 2018, the fellowship has awarded $360 million to 18,000 individuals.