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From Statler Hall to Eleven Madison Park: A Cornell Alum Success Story

This week, I was lucky enough to interview Max Aronson, a recent Cornell graduate from 2019. Graduating from the School of Hotel Administration with a concentration in Beverage Management, he is now an assistant server at Eleven Madison Park — a fine dining restaurant located in the Flatiron District of Manhattan. Eleven Madison Park is ranked third among The World’s 50 Best Restaurants in 2016 and is known for their taste and presentation. Let’s take a look at how Max is doing today. 1.

Interview with Benjamin Velani ’22

From investigating the changing bar culture to growing his own produce, Benjamin Velani ’22, The Sun’s dining editor, can always be counted on for food tips and advice! He shares what else the dining department has in store for readers — stay tuned and get excited!

Interview with Anu Subramaniam ’20

Before becoming The Sun’s editor in chief on the 137th editorial board, Anu Subramaniam ’20 reported extensively on the Greek community. She shared with the newsletter team on how she approaches the topic — with objectivity, transparency and empathy.

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Interview with Boris Tsang ’21

Visual storytelling is an integral part of what we do. Photos taken by Boris Tsang ’21, The Sun’s photography editor, have appeared in over 700 articles at The Sun. His photos have also been featured in ESPN, CBS News, and the Cornell Chronicle. The newsletter team interviewed Boris on what it takes to capture those perfect moments.

President Martha Pollack at her office in Day Hall on May 10th, 2019.

The Sun Interviews Martha Pollack

At the end of the spring semester, The Sun had the opportunity to interview President Martha Pollack, touching on topics ranging from the expansion of mental health services, sensitivity responses to tragedies, Cornell Tech, food insecurity and Prof. Brian Wansink’s termination.

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GROSKAUFMANIS | Two College Students Walk into a Comedy Show

Chris Rock and Jerry Seinfeld, two of America’s most well-respected veteran comedians, won’t perform on college campuses. Their reasoning centers around the usual complaints about political correctness, assuming that today’s young people don’t appreciate, or maybe can’t even handle, the types of humor they tend to use in their sets. High-profile examples of clashes between college audiences and comedians are ripe for cherry-picking. Last December Nimesh Patel, a writer for SNL, was pulled off stage in the middle of a set at Columbia University after one of his jokes was deemed too offensive for the event: an example that fits snuggly into the idea that college students can’t take a joke. But in an op-ed in The New York Times that followed the incident, Patel himself acknowledged a complexity that this stereotype doesn’t completely capture, writing, “I do not think we should let the actions of a small group — actions that get blown out of proportion because they feed a narrative many people want to hear — paint college campuses as bad places to perform and paint this next generation as doomed.”
I talked to students who perform comedy at Cornell, at other universities and in cities across the United States.