Editorial

EDITORIAL: Cornell, You May Be a Fan of Hills, but Where Does This One End?

What followed the Board of Trustees announcement about the the 2020 fiscal year budget and the corresponding 3.6 percent tuition hike? An implicit announcement aimed at members of the Class of 2020: their tuition has increased 11.5 percent since they committed to the Red. The University boasted that this tuition rise was the smallest in recent years. This year’s increase comes in at $6 less than last year’s raise — that’s a single venti coffee with a shot of espresso at Cornell Dining, to put things in perspective. Maybe Cornellians should consider themselves lucky.

Director of Innovation Partnerships at Cornell Center for Technology Licensing Discusses Importance of Research Commercialization

“As the sole office responsible for protecting and managing Cornell intellectual property, CTL is uniquely positioned to help researchers to make a potential difference in people’s lives,” said Patrick Govang, director of innovation partnerships at Cornell’s Center for Technology Licensing

Cornell is ranked the last among the Ivy League by U.S. News, taking the 16th spot on the national list.

Cornell Ranked Last Among Ivy League Schools by U.S. News

Cornell is the 19th best university in the world and 11th best university in the United States, according to the World University Ranking 2019 by The Times Higher Education. Cornell is also ranked the last among the Ivy League by U.S. News, taking the 16th spot on the national list.

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RUSSELL | To My 18-year-old Black Self

Hey man! Big congrats on getting here. I mean that. In a week you’ll forget about how hard you worked to get into a school like this and you’ll just get caught up trying to make it to the next goal, so please just pat yourself on the back while you still have time to reflect. I’m sure you’re proud to surprise your high school guidance counselor who coulda’ sworn you were going to an HBCU.

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GLANZEL | In Defense of The Ivy League

A couple years ago, a former English professor at Yale published an article in the New Republic entitled, “Don’t Send Your Kid to the Ivy League.” The title reflected a growing sense of hostility towards elitist institutions of higher education across the nation. Over the last few years, there has been a sort of a backlash against Ivy League-type schools — from President Trump’s attacks on university endowments, to the assaults from conservative media groups that label the Ivy League as a harbor for radical snowflakes. At the risk of sounding elitist and out-of-touch, I argue that the Ivy League — from its hyper-competitive admissions process, to its rigorous academics, to its army of loyal alumni — is actually good for society. Though there are certainly problems with the sort of elitism that emerges from these top schools, the Ivy League nevertheless has produced brilliant thinkers and powerful innovations that have pushed the human race forward. Among the first criticisms leveled at elite schools is the admissions process.