Attendees interact with current members and leaders at the first Professional Fraternity Recruitment Fair

Professional Fraternity Council Holds Recruitment Fair

The newly-formed Professional Fraternity Council held a recruitment fair in Baker Portico on Sunday, an opportunity for prospective members to get to know nine of the campus’s 11 pre-professional fraternities. According to Kumar Nandanampati ’20, vice president of recruitment for PFC, the driving force behind the showcase was simple. “What can we do to make recruitment fair?”

The fair’s main goal was to present the fraternities in an “egalitarian manner,” according to Nandanampati. Attendees were encouraged to walk around and interact with current members and leaders from each organization. The timing of the event was early in the semester, Nandanampati said, so that potential new members could familiarize themselves with all pre-professional organizations before any specific rush process began.

How Weill Cornell Medicine Plans to Tackle Diversity With New $2.7 Million Dollar Grant

Weill Cornell Medicine plans to use $2.7 million in funding to address the shortage of underrepresented minorities in the healthcare professions. According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, 1,410 African-American men applied to medical schools in 1978. Forty years later, that number has dropped to 1,337. Earlier this summer, Weill received a grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration in order to establish a Diversity Center of Excellence. The Center of Excellence, will function under the Cornell Center of Health Equity, which is a research initiative that analyzes health disparities and solutions to various stigmatized conditions.

Professor Ducharme has both a clinical and personal passion for horse medicine.

Rooting for the Horses: A Conversation with Professor Ducharme

Imagine running without being able to breathe. Sounds pretty terrible, right? Unfortunately, this is the reality that many horses suffer through. Seeking to solve this problem, Prof. Normand G. Ducharme, clinical sciences, has revitalized the equine industry with his work on respiratory illnesses in horses. Ducharme got involved with horse medicine when the success rate for helping race horses was low.

Worm world | Research indicates that disabling the SET-26 gene in worms increases longevity, bringing hope that a similar effect might be seen in humans.

Gene in Worms Could Be Key to Longer Human Lifespan

Popular legend claims that drinking from the fountain of youth will keep one’s body vigorous and vivacious for years to come. Prof. Sylvia Lee, molecular biology and genetics, may have discovered such an elixir in the soils of Ithaca. Her research indicates the secret of immortality may be hidden in the genome of a worm. Lee found that Caenorhabditis elegans, a common species of soil worm, has a very similar lifespan and reproductive pattern to humans, importantly sharing hallmark features of human aging. These similarities make C. elegans a premier experimental model to reveal the mysterious mechanisms of mortality in humans.