SMITH | I Don’t Want to Hear About Your (Keto) Diet

Content Warning: Discussion of dieting and restriction

As a senior in nutritional sciences, simply stating my major usually results in some comment from somebody about their diet, be it defensive or inquisitive. I’m usually unbothered by these encounters, and I view eating as a deeply personal activity, since people’s eating habits can be driven by complex factors. However, there is one topic that comes up so often that I feel it’s necessary to make my opinion abundantly clear: You probably should not try the keto diet. Even for people not specializing in nutrition, I don’t think anyone will fight me when I say that protein is the golden child of nutrition. Compared to its macronutrient siblings (carbs and fat), protein can essentially do no wrong.

A Foodie’s Trip to the Doctor

What do your teeth, brain, mood and gut all have in common? Unsurprisingly, it turns out one answer is almost everything. They are, after all, interconnected and essential aspects of your body and life. The other, often overlooked answer, however, is food. The COVID pandemic put into perspective how little control we have over certain parts of our health, but quarantine was sobering, proving we don’t have to be “an inert chunk of randomly assembled molecules drifting wherever the universe blows” us.  In fact, the decisions we make about our food give us resounding leverage over our health.

A Gutsy Endeavor: Understanding Metabolites of the Humans’ “Hidden Organ”

Trillions of microbes inhabit the human digestive system, constituting such a critical part of our health that many researchers have taken to calling the vast, microscopic population the “hidden organ.” But despite weighing as much as five pounds and collectively containing 200 times the number of genes as the human genome, scientists still aren’t sure how these gut microbes — which include bacteria, fungi and viruses — affect human health.

A New PHeNoMena in Health

According to Prof. David Erickson, mechanical and aerospace engineering, the use of waves to guide particles, allowing for small scale chemical analysis, makes mobile health testing a possibility.

How Do the French Stay So Skinny?

But maybe the paradox isn’t that the French are skinny. Maybe it’s that Americans, in our mentality of experimentation and efficiency, are overemphasizing scientifically tested and quick and easy fixes to our health problems.

Stress, Eating and Stress-Eating

Cortisol causes metabolic dysfunction by inhibiting glucose uptake so that it the glucose can be readily used by the body. This causes cells to feel starved, triggering hunger signals to the brain.

Professor Creates Harvesting Model Designed to Improve Nutritional Value

Miguel Gómez, associate professor in the Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, has assisted in the development of a new harvesting model to help food banks improve the nutritional value of the food they distribute to the hungry. Gómez and Dyson grad Xiaoli Fan collaborated with researchers from Boston College to address challenges faced by food banks, according to Gómez. “You have food wasted on one hand and malnutrition on the other,” Gómez said in a University press release. “The food banks can make this link, but there’s a logistical problem here. Our program contributes to a solution.”
The team has been working on improving the gleaning process for fruits and vegetables, according to Fan.