Lakshmi Bhojraj '95, MBA '01

Executive Director of Cornell’s Parker Center for Investment Research Discusses Investment-Related Careers, Future of Finance

I think for finance careers in general, students typically think about investment banking, especially at the undergraduate level. Part of that is because the investment management industry is not as visible on campus, they don’t tend to recruit in as great numbers as investment banking or consulting. However, this is an area that can be very rewarding, intellectually stimulating, and lucrative. If you are interested in that blend of quantitative and qualitative skills, this is a profession you should consider.

Students participating in the workshop

Cornell Diversity & Inclusion Business Advisory Program Kicks Off 8-Week Session with Workshop “Business Basics”

On Oct. 2, the Cornell Diversity and Inclusion Business Advisory Program kicked off an eight-week workshop series with an hour-long session titled “Business Basics” with Forté, a female-only undergraduate business organization, and the Wardrobe, an organization that provides free professional attire to Cornell students. Founded in April 2019 by Claire Pan ’20, the program is funded by Dyson’s Office of Diversity & Inclusion and consists of over 45 business organizations on campus. The event opened with a resume workshop led by two Forté members, Maddie Franke ’21, vice president of external affairs and Rabia Syed ’21, initiative representative. They shared a collection of tips for constructing resumes, writing cover letters, networking and navigating LinkedIn.

Guest Room

GUEST ROOM | A Call for Transparency and Labor Focus in the ILR Dean Search

Five months after Kevin Hallock stepped down from the helm of the School of Industrial and Labor Relations to lead the newly formed SC Johnson College of Business, the nation’s premier institution of labor education and research continues in its search for a new dean. While the search committee has voiced desire for student input, we fear the opinions of those most impacted by the management of this program will not be made a central concern. In fact, the Provost has made no commitments to transparency in this process, and has indicated to faculty members that he may be departing from well-established norms by not giving faculty and students the ability to comment on candidates being considered for the position. The Provost would require the select faculty members who meet the finalists to sign confidentiality agreements, agreeing to refrain from discussing potential candidates with their colleagues. The fact that the previous dean was so easily able to transition to leading an institution of management is indicative of the corporate bias of the search process to date.

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LAM | Mismanagement Case Study: Cornell SC Johnson College of Business

Six days into the Spring semester, founding Dean of the Cornell SC Johnson College of Business Soumitra Dutta resigned, after a little more than a year and a half in the post. Weeks later, still not a word from Cornell on the reason. A Sun reporter even went to the former dean’s home to find some answers, to no avail. Of course, as a private nonprofit institution, Cornell has no legal obligation to be transparent about personnel movements. A stench of mismanagement, however, stinks to high heaven. Most, including myself, had initial doubts about the endeavour.