WEIRENS | Pants on the Ground: The Saggy Situation of Women’s Athletic Gear at Cornell

It all started with a pair of ill-fitting, droopy sweatpants. Saggy in the wrong places, tight in even worse places — they were unwearable. I gave them to a male friend. They fit him perfectly. My teammates and fellow athletes on other women’s varsity teams encountered similar grievances with these sweatpants, because they were not made for women. They were men’s pants. They simply wouldn’t stay on, and even if they did, they looked awful. 

These notorious sweatpants were mass-issued by Cornell Athletics to their athletes earlier this school year. For background, the Cornell Athletics Department issues a multitude of assorted clothing items to their athletes prior to and throughout their seasons.

MEHLER | An Athletics Convert

How many Cornell students played or captained a varsity sport in high school? I could not find any specific data points online but speaking with other students, you almost certainly can find a higher percentage of students that played varsity athletics in high school than the current 8 percent of Cornellians that still do. So what changed from high school to college that resulted in less students playing varsity sports?

BERNSTEIN | The Death of the Athlete

There comes a time in almost every high school-to college-aged kid’s life where they stop playing organized sports.

For some, it’s a moment of relief. You never really wanted to play soccer anyway, you only really did it because you weren’t half-bad and you knew your teammates and parents would be a little disappointed if you quit. Besides, it looked good on the college app. Maybe you were done after freshman year of high school because you worked up the courage to say no, this isn’t for me. Or maybe you enjoyed your time playing your sport, but you were just ready. It’d been a long season, and it was bittersweet to be done, but it was right.