Student-Published Book Celebrates Cornell Female Leaders in STEM

Forbes’ 2019 America’s Most Innovative Leaders named only one woman on the entire 100-person list. Cornell’s Society of Women Engineers saw this lack of representation as an opportunity to showcase female leaders in STEM within the Cornell community. The result was Wall of Wonder: Cornell Women Leading the Way in Science, Technology, and Engineering, a book of short biographies of 27 inspiring alumnae, written by SWE co-presidents Madeline Dubelier ’20 and Catherine Gurecky ’20, alongside member Abigail Macaluso ’20. The three also worked with David Ross Jansen ’22, a performing and media arts student who illustrated portraits of each of the women. Proceeds from the book will go to K-12 outreach programs organized by the Cornell SWE chapter.

The Code Busters: The Girls Who Code Outreach Program at Cornell

Founded in 2013, Women in Computing at Cornell aims to increase the visibility of women in computing fields. The organization empowers and advises women in academic, social and professional settings and helps young girls pursue their passions in computing. One WICC program, the Girls Who Code Outreach Program, aims to solve the gender disparity in the tech industry. According to Stephanie Shum ’20, vice president of the WICC Outreach program, the GWC club has two classes offered every Sunday for middle school and high school students in the greater Tompkins community. Their lessons are typically taught in JavaScript but also utilize HTML, CSS, Arduinos and GitHub.

Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon Celebrates Women in STEM

The Sunday event — which coincided with Ada Lovelace Day, which celebrates the contributions of one of history’s first computer programmers — was organized by librarians Selena Bryant of Mann Library, and Wendy Wilcox of Olin Library.

BARAN | STEM and Humanities? Apples and Oranges.

“Yeah, I’m a bioengineering major,” he says, his eyes shifting upwards as he does so. He knows what they’re thinking. The flash of admiration in their eyes and the almost-almost-imperceptible deference in conversation tell all. My friend Rollin is the smartest person I’ve met, and he deserves this treatment. But not for the simple reason that he is a majoring in biological engineering.