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KIM | One Dirty Plastic Bowl at a Time

I raised my speckled, squished banana out of my backpack with a mission to find the nearest compost bin. My first stop: Trillium dining hall. As soon as I entered, I saw the row of large bins and posters and spotted the small, almost unnoticeable compost sign posted to the side of where the rest of the bins were. But there was no bin. As a Trillium employee exited from the kitchen, I asked if she knew where the compost bin was.

TRILL-4

Thrilled for Trillium Late Night

What I’m trying to say is, Trillium late-night hours will be in effect for the remainder of the spring semester (and hopefully beyond), and if you are even contemplating whether or not to join me in lovingly devouring a cream pasta bowl at 8 p.m., then the answer is yesssss.

Pg-8-Dining

Is Cornell Dining Actually Sustainable?

Upon first entering Trillium, you can immediately see three large trash cans, two recycling bins and a yellow compost bin. Or should I say, five trash cans with different colors. These bins’ contents are indistinguishable — each one has a mix of recyclable plastics, food, napkins and utensils. The large informational posters above each bin seem to serve no purpose.

Photo Courtesy of commons.wikimedia.org

Definitive Rankings of All Eateries on Campus

Every student at Cornell has a different opinion on the best (and worst) places to eat on campus. The Sun’s Dining Department has decided to create a definitive list — a guide, so to speak — of where to spend your BRBs and where to avoid at all costs.

KK Yu / Sun Staff Photographer

Vegan for a Week

To be clear, this is not an article on the morals of going vegan. For my purposes, I really don’t care about the ethical background of not eating animal products. I care about weighing the costs and benefits and documenting my week-long vegan journey.