Chief Justice John G. Roberts, enters the Capitol to preside over the opening of the Senate’s impeachment trial of. President Donald Trump in Washington on Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2020.

As Senate Tries Trump, Professors Predict Impeachment Outcomes

As the impeachment of President Donald Trump moves to trial in the Senate, Cornell professors shared their views on the significance of the House charges –– and their predictions for how America’s historic impeachment trial will play out. On Tuesday afternoon, as the Senate began trial proceedings, bitter partisanship was on full display, with Senators sticking to party-lines in several key votes, The New York Times reported. By the end of Tuesday night, multiple attempts by Senate Democrats to subpoena documents from the White House had failed –– reflecting a so far intense battle on what process the impeachment trial will follow. While Democratic leaders in the chamber have insisted that additional witnesses and evidence be subpoenaed by the Senate, many Republicans have resisted such plans. “If witnesses are, in fact, called, they might have some very significant things to say, and the trial would be much longer,” Prof. Richard Bensel, government, said in an email to The Sun, who said that House Democrats’ decision to impeach Trump was the “one ethical choice.”

However, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-K.Y.) has thus far stuck to a limit on the time for arguments: three days.

From left to right: Prof. Kaushik Baru, Prof. Sarah Binder, Prof. Parfait Eloundou-Enyegue, and Rep. Steve Israel.

Celebrating Cornell’s Newest Politics Institute, Pundits Explore How Trump has Changed America

Has Trump really changed everything? This is the question that three professors and a former member of the Congress tried to answer at a panel celebrating the launch of Cornell’s new Institute of Politics and Global Affairs. Speaking in Klarman Hall on Wednesday, the four panelists discussed political polarization, the dwindling of trust in institutions and the need to bridge gaps to find common ground. Rising economic inequality, changing demographics and echo chambers in online communication “created a large group of people who feel left out and unheard,” according to one of the panelists, Prof. Parfait Eloundou-Enyegue, developmental sociology. By the time the 2016 election rolled around, those people, he said, “were in need of a champion, and here comes Trump.”

Eloundou-Enyegue said that people on the political left often turn to the law, courts and the press to address their grievances.