The Body Positive Cornell event featured activities promoting healthy lifestyles that avoid centering around weight.

Body Positive Cornell Initiative Hopes to Push Back Against Societal Stereotypes About Weight and Health

“I’m not accepting what I can’t change, I’m changing what I can’t accept,” activist and entrepreneur Sonya Renee Taylor said Sept. 20, at a Body Positive Cornell event, a University initiative striving to help Cornellians lead a healthy lifestyle that doesn’t focus on weight. “Our society tells us that we should be able to lose weight and keep it off, and always promises this or that diet as the solution,” Jennie Bernstein, Body Positive outreach coordinator at Cornell Health, told The Sun. The resulting detrimental effects including stigmatization of heavier weights and harmful behavior like “weight cycling,” the practice of losing and gaining weight repeatedly. Instead, Bernstein believes that taking the emphasis off weight and instead focusing on “improving health and lifestyle behaviors” is a better attitude towards our bodies and life in general, as weight doesn’t have a direct connection to health conditions.

Cornell Graduate Publishes Study on Employee Wellness

Rebecca Robbins ’09, M.S. ’14, Ph.D. ’15, detailed the “10 percent solution” — an attempt to promote employee wellness — in a recent study. Robbins’ paper, published in the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, aims “to understand manager reactions to … workplace wellness ideas, [as] very few workplace wellness programs systematically and thoughtfully engage managers in their efforts,” she said. The “10 percent solution” argues that linking ten percent of annual managerial salary increases to wellness actions will result in meaningful changes from managers in the workplace, according to a University press release. In the study, researchers asked managers to rate companies that involve and do not involve managers in employee wellness-promoting activities, according to Robbins.