November 20, 2015

PUTTING IT INTO FOCUS | Eight Tips for a Stress-Free Day

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By ASHLEY RADPARVAR

Having a stress free day is not the easiest of tasks to accomplish. Whether you are studying for prelims, finishing work or running from building to building, everyday can be a stressful one. Getting up for classes, having a set schedule and maintaining focus is hard if you don’t have a daily routine. Below are eight tips to making your day less stressful and a bit brighter:

  1. Wake up at least an hour before your first class. Sure this may be difficult, but it can make a big difference in maintaining a stress free morning. For a lot of students, it is extremely hard to remember everything you need, brush your teeth, get ready, have some coffee and still keep sane if they wake up 30 minutes before class starts. For your sanity, please wake up at least an hour in advance — it’s for your own good.
  2. Set your alarm to your favorite music. Set your alarm to play your favorite upbeat song. On your iPhone, you can add a song downloaded to your phone when you set your alarm. You can also set your favorite radio station to wake you up. This one little tip can be great, especially if you need some motivation in the morning.
  3. Refrain from naps. As great as naps can feel in the middle of a long day, it may be more detrimental than helpful to your daily routine. Naps can interfere with your sleep cycle, often making you stay up longer at night. Instead of falling asleep at a reasonable hour, a person who took a nap will have to sleep much earlier, thereby damaging his or her sleep cycle.
  4. Drink orange juice. Orange juice can be very efficient in helping people get up in the morning. A cup of orange juice can often be more beneficial in keeping you energized than a cup of coffee. In contrast to the temporary energy you feel when drinking coffee, orange juice naturally and gradually increases your energy through natural sugar intake, keeping you focused for a longer period of time.
  5. Eat something before you leave. Even if it’s just a granola bar, make sure you eat before you leave or take something with you to eat on your way to class. Try to buy “quick breakfasts,” food you can either put in the microwave or pull out of your refrigerator, ready to go. Waffles, yogurts, fruit, granola bars and cereal are all great choices to keep you focused throughout the day. While it may take an extra minute or two, eating breakfast makes a drastic difference in your learning efficiency and focusing ability.
  6. Make a schedule. Making a list of things to do and what time they need to be done is often one of the best and most important ways you can start off your day. Get up in the morning and set aside time to make a schedule. First, make a list of everything you have to do that day and order them in terms of priority. Then order them on a list, setting a set time for each activity. By doing so, you have a predetermined plan for the rest of your day.
  7. Stay hydrated. Drinking water can help boost your routine by a long shot. When you wake up, take a sip of water. Even better, put a water bottle on your nightstand and drink it when you wake up. You’ll feel a lot more refreshed and ready to start your day. Just a few gulps of water can help you get up earlier, helping you make those rough 8:00 AM classes on time.
  8. Walk to class with a friend. Walking to class with someone you enjoy being with is great in keeping you energized and motivated throughout the day. Having someone there to talk to and keep your mind clear and focused is a great way to get ready for class. Make it a habit to walk to class with someone. In doing so, you’ll feel focused and ready to start learning.

Ashley Radparvar is a freshman in the College of Arts and Sciences. She is a music enthusiast, a self-proclaimed winter weather aficionado and an SNL devotee. In her spare time, she can be found on the Slope, enjoying the wonderful views Ithaca has to offer. Putting It Into Focus appears on alternate Fridays this semester. She can be reached at aar98@cornell.edu.  

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