Letter to the Editor

Letter to the Editor: Re ‘International Student’s Ph.D. Withheld After Title IX Complaint Accuses Him of “Retaliatory” Publication of Information’

To the Editor:

I am writing to express my concern about the writing in an article titled, “International Student’s Ph.D. Withheld After Title IX Complaint Accuses Him of ‘Retaliatory’ Publication of Information.” Thoughtful and accurate reporting on sexual assault and harassment is imperative due to the fraught nature of these topics. Precise language and attention to tone accurately communicate written information. This article contains accolades and opinions about the accused student’s academic status (“Patil appears to be a talented student”). The heavy-handed language and disproportionate attention given to the problems he and his family are facing seem to indirectly blame the student who filed the complaint (LA) while portraying Patil as the singular victim. I recognize that LA declined to comment on this story leaving The Sun with little information to include from her perspective, however, this tone amplifies Patil’s obstacles over any potential retaliation faced by LA.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: New hard alcohol rules will not solve alcohol problems

The following is an open letter to President Martha Pollack. Dear President Pollack,

Underage drinking, particularly of hard liquor, has and always will exist on college campuses. Since neither you or I can change the legal drinking age, I would hope we could ensure that when this drinking does occur, it occurs in a regulated environment. The banning of hard liquor from chapter houses inevitably does nothing to the amount of hard liquor consumed by college students, but rather changes the locations in which this consumption occurs. Rather than occur in an environment in which there are sober monitors and university policies in place, such as Greek mixers, they will occur in unregulated off-campus environments.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Cornell community members denounce Israeli military actions

We, the undersigned members of the Cornell University community, call on Cornellians of conscience to denounce the Israeli military’s recent massacre of unarmed Palestinian protesters participating in the Great March of Return in the Gaza Strip. Since March 30, 2018, thousands of Palestinian civilians, including youth, women and men, have affirmed their internationally-recognized “right of return” as historically displaced persons by marching peacefully toward the border between the Gaza Strip and Israel. The Israeli military has responded with indiscriminate lethal force. Military officials have declared an area 300 meters inside the border fence a “kill zone,” and video evidence shows that soldiers are shooting protesters well behind that line, as well. The Israeli military has killed more than 30 Palestinians.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Re: ‘Affordable Care Act Provisions that Went Beyond Healthcare “unseen by the public eye,” Professor Says’

To the Editor:

I generally agree with the idea that the government should engage more actively with its constituents regarding federal policies to challenge the submerged state, but I believe the effects of the Affordable Care Act did not go unnoticed. Many initiatives in the ACA took years to implement, and they took effect gradually over the course of several years. A few of the milestones, such as long-term care insurance (2011), 3.8 percent surcharge on individuals who make over $200,000 (2013) and prohibition of insurance companies from denying individuals with preexisting conditions (2014) were all implemented after the 2010 midterm elections. Indeed, one of the most important pieces of the ACA — the Medicaid expansion — became effective in January 2014 and the Congressional Budget Office is continually updating the increase in health insurance coverage rate today. While there are provisions in the ACA that may go unnoticed, milestones like Medicaid expansion probably did not escape the public eye.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Prof responds to her statements quoted in ‘Cornell Students Rally in Support of Gaza Protest’

To the Editor:

In regards to a statement that I made at the rally last week in support of the people in Gaza, my comment, reported by Ms. Curley, was only a few words of a longer statement in which I indicated that the issue was not only a political issue, but a human rights issue, and that those interested didn’t need to know the deep politics of the issue in order to get involved and stand in solidarity with Palestine on the human rights issue alone. Since the Six Day War of 1967, the U.N. has repeatedly cited Israel for human rights violations in the Occupied Territories and Gaza, which has been described as the “largest outdoor prison in the world.”

In response to those who would characterize the situation as terrorist Palestinians vs. innocent Israelis, I suggest they refer to the U.N. “Report of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Palestinian territories occupied since 1967” from which I excerpt the following:
According to B’Tselem [The Israeli Information Center for Human Rights in the Occupied Territories], between 1987 and 2000 just under 1,400 Palestinians were killed by ISF [Israeli Security Forces]. After the year 2000, deaths of Palestinians caused by ISF accelerated, with more than 6,700 deaths, as at October 2013. Of this number, over 3,100 were civilians not involved in hostilities.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Re: ‘Cornell Students Rally in Support of Gaza Protest’

To the Editor: 

In her article, “Cornell Students Rally…”, Cornell Daily Sun reporter Julia Curley quotes CCJP founder Prof. Darlene Evans’ contention that “You don’t have to know about what’s going on in Palestine…to stand in solidarity with Palestine.” Let’s examine that contention. The CCJP represents as “non-violent” the Gaza/Palestinians who throw firebombs, attempt to plant explosives (IEDs and hand grenades) to breach the border with and invade Israel, and are exhorted by their elected government, Hamas, to then “eat the livers” of Israelis. Describing such actions and verbiage as “non-violent” suggests a seriously disordered CCJP agenda. Prof. Evans evidently feels you don’t have to know that there is a Gaza border closure by both Israel and Egypt. Gazans are not setting off IEDs, launching firebombs, burning tires or attempting to breach their border with Egypt, because they know Egypt’s military would not respond with the restraint shown by the IDF.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: A Warning in the Wake of Greenwood

To the Editor:

In what can only be laughably called a punishment, John Greenwood ’20 took a plea deal and was ordered to do 75 hours of community service — less time than the membership requirements of most Cornell service organizations — for an assault and racial slurs that, if committed by a black student against a white one, would have inevitably resulted in jail time, and no such plea deal. It is striking to come to the realization that we are living in a world where this can be considered an adequate reprimand for such community-wrenching actions. Greenwood barely received a slap on the wrist for something that has toppled our community’s sense of safety: a distorted response, when compared to our community’s reckoning in the wake of this incident. The truth is that distortion is, and has been, the reality. This case, like so many before it, became a war of attrition rather than a true criminal proceeding.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: DSOC students and alumni condemn proposed College of Social Sciences

To the Editor:

We, the undersigned students and recent alumni of the Department of Development Sociology, unequivocally condemn the proposed integration of DSOC into a new social sciences-specific college. The word “sociology” in Development Sociology does not mean that DSOC is a conventional social science in the vein of anthropology or linguistics. The word instead stems from the department’s commitment to rural sociology — a unique discipline that studies access to natural resources and sustainable livelihoods, particularly in communities on the peripheries of global capitalism. DSOC is an applied form of sociology that concerns itself with critical issues surrounding agricultural and community development, making the the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences its perfect home. Crucially, DSOC enjoys exceptionally synergistic relationships with other CALS Departments that also center the empathetic study of the Global South, including International Agriculture & Rural Development and Global & Public Health Sciences.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Elections Committee on Election Outcome

To the Editor:

We’d like to start by thanking all who participated in this election. It has been a long cycle for the candidates, members of the Elections Committee and the student body as a whole. As we come to a conclusion, the Elections Committee would like to address concerns that have been brought up during this process. Before we begin, we must make it clear that we are bound by confidentiality regarding specifics around candidate challenges. Because of this, we cannot directly address the veracity of all claims brought up regarding this election, but we will do what we can.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Where is the Cornell community?

To the Editor:

Over the past several months, we have been inundated with emails from Cornell’s administration in the wake of racist incidents, always addressed to the “Ithaca Campus Community.” These messages always condemn bigotry, and claim that the Presidential Task Force on Campus Climate is working to make Cornell a more inclusive community. But as these attacks continue, we struggle to define exactly what this “Cornell community” is. We all have our own communities on campus that make us feel safe, empowered and challenged, but is there a greater sense of community that makes us feel responsible for the safety of others? When violent bigoted incidents occur on campus, not everyone is equally affected. The majority of people who condemn the attacks and mobilize against a weak administrative response are directly impacted by the incidents.