LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Let’s Honor RBG

To the Editor:

Ruth Bader Ginsburg ‘54 loved Cornell. She spent much of her life near the Hill in Washington, but she never forgot our Hill in Ithaca. She often fondly recalled her undergrad years and she remained an active alumna, frequently giving her time to the University. And the Cornell community loves Ruth Bader Ginsburg. As one of our most notable alums, her name is commonly invoked as a point of pride.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Re: ‘The Paradox of Fall Semester’

To the Editor:

Sun writer Anil Oza quotes from President Martha E. Pollack on the scientific basis for opening Cornell and Andrew V. Lorenzen highlights some important issues with that decision in his column.  On a broader scale, science often involves making a model and testing it. Cornell leadership has, under very difficult circumstances, overseen the development of a COVID-19 model and plan in which the Provost and President strongly believe. As many Cornell students are taught, confidence in a model depends on how well predictions of the model have been tested and supported. The Cornell model has not been tested, but the first test involving all of us is imminent. Maybe the outcome will be in accord with the model (hopefully!) and maybe not.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: RE: ‘The Paradox of Fall Semester’

To the Editor:
In his editorial entitled, ‘The Paradox of the Fall Semester’ Andrew V. Lorenzen presented a thoughtful analysis of the science involved in re-opening Cornell. In particular, he analyzed the assumptions, axioms, postulates, self-evident facts or whatever you want to call them, upon which the model and the analysis were based. This is so rarely done in the use, misuse and abuse of science today. I applaud Mr. Lorenzen for presenting science as it should be presented. In a speech entitled, What is Science?, Richard Feynman said: “As a matter of fact, I can also define science another way: Science is the belief in the ignorance of experts.