A CTB Order for Every Zodiac Sign

Aries — March 21 to April 19 

The Southwest Breakfast Wrap has a little bit of everything with a spicy kick to pair with an Aries’ spunkiness. Aries are not afraid of a challenge and can take on this monstrous burrito filled with scrambled eggs, black beans, green peppers, jalapenos, salsa and pepper jack without hesitation. Easily bored, they opt for the seasonal lemonade to keep things fresh and new. 

Taurus — April 20 to May 20

Tauruses fall in love with the soothing aromas of this CTB order. The Stewart Parker provides a turkey and cheese combo on a buttery croissant that makes Tauruses feel at home. This simple order neglects out-of-the-ordinary ingredients that would scare a Taurus away; the addition of a hot tea provides a few minutes of much needed relaxation before returning to their studies.

Composting at Cornell: C+

COVID-19 caused a massive shift towards single-use plastics as a safer way to distribute meals, but they are the least creative option available. An institution with as much means as Cornell Dining could, and slowly is finding new ways to integrate more effective composting and recycling strategies.

AUSTIN | A (Not So) Mathematical Mocha Cake

In this Moosewood Mess, Austin eyeballs a mocha cake recipe and absolutely nails it … except for the mocha part (but who has to know?). Austin reflects on how making surprise three course meals that have a dessert is so worth the trouble when you see the delight in your friends’ faces.

Food Cultural Appropriation: It’s Personal

I am first generation Chinese-Vietnamese. Both of my parents immigrated to the United States as a result of the Vietnam War. My closest connection to my Vietnamese culture, like many children of immigrants, is food. Food is part of my identity. Food is personal. 

Unfortunately, many Asian Americans remember childhood experiences of feeling ashamed after being told that their food was gross or that it smelled weird.

Corned Beef Contains No Corn, and Other Things You Didn’t Know About Irish Food

Your life changes the day you realize that “sweetmeats” are actually pastries, “mincemeat” can refer to dried fruit cooked into a pie and ordering a plate of “sweetbreads” will get you a tasty calf pancreas. Misnomers like these just make you trust the world a little bit less. So, you can imagine how distraught I was to learn that corned beef has literally nothing to do with the yellow vegetable that grows on stalks. Well … almost nothing. 

“Corn” as we know it in Modern English has a rich etymology dating back to the Proto-Germanic kurnam, meaning “small seed.” This creates an obvious connection to the corn that we eat grilled with butter; what are kernels if not hundreds of small seeds lined up in a row? But Old English used the word corn much how we use “grain” today — that is to say, corn referred to the overarching category of small, granular cereals rather than to any specific plant.

Who Belongs in the Kitchen?

Picture a celebrity chef — someone you always saw on your television screen growing up. You might think of a competition show host or the head chef at your city’s fanciest restaurant. Do you have them in your mind? Ready? Are they a man? 

Now think about your favorite meal growing up.

AUSTIN | It’s a Crisp! It’s a Cobbler! It’s a Crispler!

I’ve always loved the phrase “old soul”; it brings to mind an image of a very whimsical creature — one untouched by the mundanities of life. It tends not to describe an early bedtime, insomnia or creaky joints. Unfortunately, the only reason someone would ever refer to me as an “old soul” is if they were referring to my 10 p.m. bedtime. 

This is why I’m completely baffled as to why I thought it was a good idea to start baking a Moosewood recipe at 11 p.m. At 11:30 p.m., as I awaited my Blueberry Cobbler’s exit from the oven, I fought to keep my eyes open in an effort to not burn my house down. 

As I progress through this Moosewood journey, it is becoming harder and harder to choose a recipe every week. Because I prefer baking to cooking, I’ve been disproportionately relying on the Moosewood Restaurant Book of Desserts for my weekly “experiment.” Sadly, I’m a college student on a budget and don’t have the funds (nor the justification) to pay for an ingredient that I’ll only use once.

I Drank a Gallon of Water Every Day for a Week

One fine morning, at the elite hour of 3 a.m., I’m lying in bed browsing through YouTube — mainly skin care videos that I know I’ll never follow but watch anyway — when a certain video catches my eye: “I drank a GALLON of water EVERY DAY for a WEEK | weight loss + before & after results.” The thumbnail boldly claims that the creator lost 6 whole pounds just from drinking a gallon of water every day. My first thought was, “Girl, if I knew it was that easy I would have hopped on the water train ages ago.” 

On campus I always carry my handy dandy Camelbak water bottle and drink around one to two liters a day. However, being at home is a whole other story. Especially during breaks, my middle name is lazy — I drink one glass of water per meal, which is only around two glasses for me since I wake up at noon — or, “More like 2 p.m.,” according to my mom. So, I thought, why not try what the YouTuber did and see what happens? 

Day one: I started by recording how my face looked, how dry my skin felt and what my weight was.

AUSTIN | From Fear To Focaccia

I hate being in my apartment alone. Every creak of the floorboards or slam of the front door sends me scurrying to the kitchen for some sort of self-defense weapon. And don’t even get me started on having to kill bugs. So, when I moved back after winter break nearly a week before my roommate, I had to find ways to keep myself occupied. Otherwise, my imagination would run wild, turning the snowman across the street into a lurking kidnapper with a propensity for unsuspecting five-foot-tall girls.