Corned Beef Contains No Corn, and Other Things You Didn’t Know About Irish Food

Your life changes the day you realize that “sweetmeats” are actually pastries, “mincemeat” can refer to dried fruit cooked into a pie and ordering a plate of “sweetbreads” will get you a tasty calf pancreas. Misnomers like these just make you trust the world a little bit less. So, you can imagine how distraught I was to learn that corned beef has literally nothing to do with the yellow vegetable that grows on stalks. Well … almost nothing. 

“Corn” as we know it in Modern English has a rich etymology dating back to the Proto-Germanic kurnam, meaning “small seed.” This creates an obvious connection to the corn that we eat grilled with butter; what are kernels if not hundreds of small seeds lined up in a row? But Old English used the word corn much how we use “grain” today — that is to say, corn referred to the overarching category of small, granular cereals rather than to any specific plant.

Who Belongs in the Kitchen?

Picture a celebrity chef — someone you always saw on your television screen growing up. You might think of a competition show host or the head chef at your city’s fanciest restaurant. Do you have them in your mind? Ready? Are they a man? 

Now think about your favorite meal growing up.

AUSTIN | It’s a Crisp! It’s a Cobbler! It’s a Crispler!

I’ve always loved the phrase “old soul”; it brings to mind an image of a very whimsical creature — one untouched by the mundanities of life. It tends not to describe an early bedtime, insomnia or creaky joints. Unfortunately, the only reason someone would ever refer to me as an “old soul” is if they were referring to my 10 p.m. bedtime. 

This is why I’m completely baffled as to why I thought it was a good idea to start baking a Moosewood recipe at 11 p.m. At 11:30 p.m., as I awaited my Blueberry Cobbler’s exit from the oven, I fought to keep my eyes open in an effort to not burn my house down. 

As I progress through this Moosewood journey, it is becoming harder and harder to choose a recipe every week. Because I prefer baking to cooking, I’ve been disproportionately relying on the Moosewood Restaurant Book of Desserts for my weekly “experiment.” Sadly, I’m a college student on a budget and don’t have the funds (nor the justification) to pay for an ingredient that I’ll only use once.

I Drank a Gallon of Water Every Day for a Week

One fine morning, at the elite hour of 3 a.m., I’m lying in bed browsing through YouTube — mainly skin care videos that I know I’ll never follow but watch anyway — when a certain video catches my eye: “I drank a GALLON of water EVERY DAY for a WEEK | weight loss + before & after results.” The thumbnail boldly claims that the creator lost 6 whole pounds just from drinking a gallon of water every day. My first thought was, “Girl, if I knew it was that easy I would have hopped on the water train ages ago.” 

On campus I always carry my handy dandy Camelbak water bottle and drink around one to two liters a day. However, being at home is a whole other story. Especially during breaks, my middle name is lazy — I drink one glass of water per meal, which is only around two glasses for me since I wake up at noon — or, “More like 2 p.m.,” according to my mom. So, I thought, why not try what the YouTuber did and see what happens? 

Day one: I started by recording how my face looked, how dry my skin felt and what my weight was.

AUSTIN | From Fear To Focaccia

I hate being in my apartment alone. Every creak of the floorboards or slam of the front door sends me scurrying to the kitchen for some sort of self-defense weapon. And don’t even get me started on having to kill bugs. So, when I moved back after winter break nearly a week before my roommate, I had to find ways to keep myself occupied. Otherwise, my imagination would run wild, turning the snowman across the street into a lurking kidnapper with a propensity for unsuspecting five-foot-tall girls.

Love Potions for Mortals

We’ve all been there — you’ve tried every love potion on the market (even your mother-in-law’s horrifying concoction of Mountain Dew and toad legs), and none seem to bring back the spark that you and your Valentine found back in 1252. Things were going great: You spent your days terrorizing the locals with blasphemous femininist ideology while your Valentine tended to the fields. Though your relationship was largely peaceful, you went through the occasional rough patch. Luckily, any lover’s spat could be quickly solved with a trip to Eros’ temple, where he graciously offered free couples counseling and a warm cup of spiced wine. 

But those were the old days; ever since he started working at that TJ Maxx on 5th Avenue to pay his rent, Eros has simply had no time for any of his loyal customers anymore. What’s a gal got to do to spice up her relationship these days?

Insect Extinction: Why You should Care and What You Can Do

In primary school, we learned that pollinators jump from flower to flower and help plants reproduce, giving us a myriad of vegetables, flowers and fruits. We learned that a pollinator can be a bee, a butterfly, a bat, a bird or plenty of other tiny creatures. Then, at some point in middle school, we learned that at the end of last century, agriculture started to turn towards pesticides and pollinators began to disappear. But now, in university, we don’t have to learn about bugs anymore. Unless we are entomology or environmental science majors, insects are the last thing we think about and their extinction is something to which we shrug, or even applaud. 

Even though primary school tried to teach us the importance of every species in the food chain, adulthood seems to suggest otherwise.

Brain Food for Finals

For Cornell students, tomorrow marks the official beginning of finals. It’s the last push before our well-deserved winter break, and the stress is certainly piling on. With so much to balance between long study sessions and three hour exams, it’s easy for us to ignore our health and wellbeing. Unfortunately, many of us make the critical mistake of not realizing that success during finals week is a result of  how we treat ourselves. Finding time to plan meals and not depending on six cups of coffee a day might be difficult, but now is the most important time to prioritize your health. 

Our diet is the basis for our body’s ability to function properly.

AUSTIN | Eat With Your Eyes

Normally when people write articles about their cooking experiences, there’s always a picture attached of the dish they made. Have you ever wondered why there are never food pictures in my articles? It’s because nothing ever looks good. I don’t know if it’s my inability to plate food or my lack of understanding regarding “angles” and “lighting,” but no matter what color the dish is, it always looks brown and sad on camera. I’m not a very aesthetically pleasing cook.

Bee Grateful this Holiday Season

With fall coming to a quick close and snow flurries blanketing campus, winter has finally arrived. If you are like me, you have already begun preparing for an annual hibernation, stocking up on Swiss Miss and holiday cheer. Along with us are the unsung heroes of our global food and environmental sustainability: the honey bees. Every winter, honey bee colonies prepare for the cold by forming tight clusters within the hive and slowly eating away the honey they worked so hard to produce all year long. Beekeepers find themselves busy insulating the hives and, most importantly, harvesting the excess honey from the fall flower blooms. 

The process of harvesting honey is a simple, yet fascinating one.