FROM THE EDITOR: In an Uncertain Future, The Sun is Here for You

From the editors: 

From our office on 139 W. State Street, we try to serve the public by producing consistent, comprehensive reporting. We continue to bring you recent, responsible reporting regarding changes to campus and to the city online as they happen. But due to circumstances bigger than The Sun, we will cease regular print production after spring break until the fall. If our papers feel thin these next two weeks, know that we reduce our production to lessen the burden on the staffers and editors who work silently behind the scenes to bring the pages to your hands. We aim to always bring the highest quality coverage we can; but as our student staff is scattered across the globe and governments recommend cutting nonessential in-person work, we find that the best way to communicate to our readers will be in our online coverage.

FROM THE EDITOR: Up to Bat

Twenty years old and retired — that’s the dream. For the 137th Editorial Board of The Cornell Daily Sun, this will become our reality as we step back from checking Slack and our emails every 30 seconds to give a new set of editors the chance to make The Sun shine. During the process The Sun so fondly knows as compet, these editors-to-be will step up to the plate and take on the late nights, take out the Oxford commas and work toward being elected into an editorship on the 138th Editorial Board. Though it will be a very stark change of pace for those of us on the 137th Editorial Board, we will take a step back, to allow these editors the chance to learn and grow. Come March, they lead The Sun into a new year with their names glowing brightly on the masthead that has held its former editors’ names since 1880.

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR | The Sun Did Intergroup Dialogue Project and so Should You

Each Cornellian brings nearly two decades worth of life experiences to the Hill before we begin to change and be changed by Cornell. In those formative years — spent oceans, state-lines or maybe just a TCAT ride away from our collective home on campus — our communities decided for us whether we wear tennis shoes or sneakers, whether you see actual culinary value in a CTB bagel and whether we deem it acceptable to wear anything thicker than a windbreaker in September. But the places we call home before we arrived on campus, equipped with red lanyards and the identities we brought from those homes, also shape how we react to meeting our often wealthy, artistically talented peers. They affect how absurd we find “a portrait of Jesus with condoms taped to his nipples” in our living space. They determine how desirable we feel in the dating-verse of Cornell.

FROM THE EDITOR: Make The Sun Shine

Bittersweet. As we transition into another changing of the seasons on The Hill, we open our arms to an entire new class of bright minds with untapped potential. A whole new journey packed with transformative experiences and endless growth is beginning for thousands of new students and we at The Sun are ready to experience it alongside you. We are thankful to our now graduated staff, editors and business associates who helped carry The Sun through their tenure and left it burning as bright as ever. But we are ready to keep burning bright.

FROM THE EDITOR: It’s Always Sunny in Ithaca

This past Saturday, The Sun took on the hefty task of electing its newest editorial board, the 137th. As a board, we are excited to take off where the 136th left off and are inspired to forge our own paths. It is such a privilege for us to continue the 139-year legacy that is The Sun and the thousands of individuals who have supported our institution. Last year’s board took The Sun mobile with the launch of its app. It was accompanied by continued growth from our web and design teams and we saw a greater push for graphics, sketches and interactivity with our audience.

FROM THE EDITOR: Once More Unto the Breach

To fully describe my past year at The Sun would require more space and more profanity than I am comfortable with or able to use here. All of the stresses and pressures of doing good journalism, the late nights, emotional stories, unforgiving deadlines and a critical readership, are compounded infinitely for student journalists. We live with, eat with, sleep with and study with the very subjects of our reporting — there is no escape for us from this paper’s impact — all while balancing our responsibilities as full-time students at a university not known for its easiness. It is enough to try even the most seasoned practitioners. But I cannot imagine a group of students handling those challenges with more grace, poise and talent than the members of the 136th Editorial Board.

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR | Let the Games Begin!

Cornellians have a thing for pretentious names. We call our midterms “prelims,” our hills “slopes,” and our everything bagels “Long Island.” When it comes to stupid names, we at The Cornell Daily Sun are no better — and I’m not just talking about those times when design editor Emma Williams ’19 would sarcastically call me “Supreme Leader” in her emails. No, the pretentious name to which we are most attached is “compet.”
What is compet? The exact etymology is, like too much at Cornell, shrouded in mystery, but if you look closely, you’ll notice it bears a striking resemblance to the word “compete” with the second “e” lopped off. Coincidentally, compet is the time during which staffers at The Sun compete against each other for editorships.

FROM THE EDITOR: Nothing to Kvetch About Here

Today is the final day of print publication this semester for The Cornell Daily Sun. Though we will continue to publish occasional stories online over the next month and half, the good folks at 139 W State Street have begun to shift their focus away from hard-hitting journalism and toward — God willing — passing their finals. But fear not, reader. On January 21, The Sun will rise once more from its winter slumber, replenished by latkes, Christmas hams, and various other winter foods of choice, and ready to shine its light on Ithaca again. This semester, The Sun proved again the need for quality, independent journalism on college campuses.