Where Does Dining Hall Fish Come From?

Cornell was the first Ivy to be certified by the Marine Stewardship Council for serving sustainable seafood in 2012, and today campus dining halls continue to provide students with fresh fish and crustaceans on a regular basis.

A CTB Order for Every Zodiac Sign

Aries — March 21 to April 19 

The Southwest Breakfast Wrap has a little bit of everything with a spicy kick to pair with an Aries’ spunkiness. Aries are not afraid of a challenge and can take on this monstrous burrito filled with scrambled eggs, black beans, green peppers, jalapenos, salsa and pepper jack without hesitation. Easily bored, they opt for the seasonal lemonade to keep things fresh and new. 

Taurus — April 20 to May 20

Tauruses fall in love with the soothing aromas of this CTB order. The Stewart Parker provides a turkey and cheese combo on a buttery croissant that makes Tauruses feel at home. This simple order neglects out-of-the-ordinary ingredients that would scare a Taurus away; the addition of a hot tea provides a few minutes of much needed relaxation before returning to their studies.

Composting at Cornell: C+

COVID-19 caused a massive shift towards single-use plastics as a safer way to distribute meals, but they are the least creative option available. An institution with as much means as Cornell Dining could, and slowly is finding new ways to integrate more effective composting and recycling strategies.

AUSTIN | A (Not So) Mathematical Mocha Cake

In this Moosewood Mess, Austin eyeballs a mocha cake recipe and absolutely nails it … except for the mocha part (but who has to know?). Austin reflects on how making surprise three course meals that have a dessert is so worth the trouble when you see the delight in your friends’ faces.

What’s Here 2Stay?

After a 3-month hiatus, Collegetown’s most exciting new restaurant returned with a bang. Student marketers hummed around Collegetown, shouting down would-be customers and zealously offering free samples to whoever stopped for more than a second. The boisterous atmosphere continued inside. The shop itself was buzzing with activity: Music blaring, employees lively and smiling — practically a party in the store. In spite of the theatrics, the online order was right on time, and after a short sojourn I was ready to bring to you a comprehensive review of (nearly) every item on 2Stay 2Go’s online menu.

2 Stay 2 Go 2.0

2 Stay 2 Go, the entirely student-run restaurant that made their debut last semester, is back up and running. With an expanded staff, the business has grown to include more community service, meal donations to help end food insecurity in Ithaca and a catering program.

Food Cultural Appropriation: It’s Personal

I am first generation Chinese-Vietnamese. Both of my parents immigrated to the United States as a result of the Vietnam War. My closest connection to my Vietnamese culture, like many children of immigrants, is food. Food is part of my identity. Food is personal. 

Unfortunately, many Asian Americans remember childhood experiences of feeling ashamed after being told that their food was gross or that it smelled weird.

Beans and Greens at Ithaca’s Newest Cafe, Botanist Coffeehouse

Successful modern restaurants are those which evoke pleasure through both their food and atmosphere. The more “instagrammable” the interior and décor, the more business it will attract — especially from millennials and Gen Z-ers. And in Ithaca, which has more restaurants per capita than NYC, the competition is fierce. There are at least a dozen coffee shops, each small, with high-quality beans and different spirits. The newest is Botanist Coffeehouse, a combination café and flower shop in Fall Creek.

Corned Beef Contains No Corn, and Other Things You Didn’t Know About Irish Food

Your life changes the day you realize that “sweetmeats” are actually pastries, “mincemeat” can refer to dried fruit cooked into a pie and ordering a plate of “sweetbreads” will get you a tasty calf pancreas. Misnomers like these just make you trust the world a little bit less. So, you can imagine how distraught I was to learn that corned beef has literally nothing to do with the yellow vegetable that grows on stalks. Well … almost nothing. 

“Corn” as we know it in Modern English has a rich etymology dating back to the Proto-Germanic kurnam, meaning “small seed.” This creates an obvious connection to the corn that we eat grilled with butter; what are kernels if not hundreds of small seeds lined up in a row? But Old English used the word corn much how we use “grain” today — that is to say, corn referred to the overarching category of small, granular cereals rather than to any specific plant.