Avocado toast (Ben Parker/Sun Assistant Photography Editor)

Mom Won’t Make Me Food Anymore

I won’t spend much time remarking on how unprecedented today’s circumstances are or emphasizing how important it is to self-isolate. These ideas have received their share of attention already. My parents, with their arduous Soviet mentalities, taught that in times of desperation and confusion, focus on those aspects of your life which are under your control. Instead of staring at the number of confirmed cases on worldometer.com, clean your room. Instead of worrying about the thousands of elders at risk, call your grandmother.

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Countryside Amish Market

Teddy Matel ‘22 and I coasted down Cornell’s hills into Ithaca, the sun warming our backs and the wind chilling our faces. When we reached town, Teddy led us to Black Diamond Trail, an 8.4 mile stretch of stone dust, converted from an old railroad bed, that passes through a mix of woodlands and fields along the western shore of Cayuga Lake. The trail ended at Taughannock Falls State Park, a 750-acre park northwest of Ithaca near Trumansburg, and we jetted onto Route 96, the adjacent road. By this time, the sun was at its peak in the sky. After five miles down the shoulder of  Route 96, Teddy and I darted left, and we quickly found ourselves biking on a pebble road.

Margaritas (Ben Parker/Sun Assistant Photography Editor)

Food Ethics | To Make Margaritas

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To make margaritas, you need lime juice, and a lot of it. Limes are not native to central New York, so I knew this would constitute the greatest sacrifice of food miles. However, due to our special occasion, I decided it was a worthwhile sacrifice. Isaac is Mexican and missing home, so I hoped this would bring him joy. As we were both very hungry, Isaac offered to help me juice the limes.

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WEEK 2 RESULTS: Dining Hall March Madness Matchups

In week two of the Dining Hall March Madness Matchups, eight of Cornell’s finest eateries battled for supremacy in the eyes of The Sun’s subjective staff writers and editors. Here were the matchups. 

 

Trillium’s impressive short order lunch options, like ramen and quesadillas, are contesting Terrace’s famous burrito bar and phở station for a position in the Final Four. Risley may have defeated RPCC, but will gluten free, vegetarian and lactose intolerant friendly options be enough to take on Rose’s Sunday brunch specials? Keeton’s famed southern fair comes head-to-head with Cook house’s Indian specialties. Café Jennie shoots for victory by bolstering a large variety of macarons and specialty drinks, like turmeric tea — but will it be enough?

DINING.store_interior

Old-Fashioned Diner With Vegan Twist: Angelhearts Surprises

When you envision a diner, images of piles of eggs, bacon, fries and pancakes come to mind. At Ithaca’s first vegan diner, Angelhearts, very similar items can be found on the menu. The Engelharts, who have long craved starting a family-owned restaurant, opened Angelhearts Diner in August of 2019. According to an Ithaca Journal article, Kim named the diner “Angelhearts” because by eating vegan, “you are choosing compassion in your food.” The family makes every dish from scratch, aside from Susie’s Seitan, which is made locally in Ithaca. They create vegan cheeses out of cashews and soy, offer many gluten-free and wheat-free options and focus on fresh ingredients.

A chicken pot pie from Diep Tran, chef and owner of Good Girl Dinette.

Somewhat Sober | Comfort in Food during Uneasy Times

This article was originally supposed to be about how quesadillas are the perfect late-night, post-drinking snack. But, given the global health crisis, it’s really not the most important thing to be writing about, is it? First, I really hope everyone is taking this crisis seriously and is practicing social distancing. Please do not congregate in large crowds and avoid being in public places — such as restaurants, bars or cafés — as much as possible! Taking this seriously is very important to limit the exposure of those who are at the most risk.

Meditation Mount, a tranquil spot that includes hiking paths, gardens and scenic mountaintop views, in the Ventura County town of Ojai, Calif., Feb. 25, 2020. (Beth Coller/The New York Times)

Food Ethics | Zen Instructions on How to Treat Your Eyeballs

I watched in horror as the half cup of uncooked Jasmine rice slipped from my hands and scattered across the carpet floor. The metal measuring cup ricocheted off the ground, projecting rice in every which way. This was my first attempt to prepare a Zen cuisine meal and, from a Zen perspective, I was having an abysmal start. My mind raced to my closet where my vacuum sat waiting and without hesitation my legs meandered to the corner. It was the quick and effortless solution.

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A Spicy Take on Chronic Pain

One of my earliest memories is of being five or six and having my father, a spicy food fanatic, make me eat one of the dried chilis that comes in kung pao chicken. That was the day I learned that the best antidote to a mouth on fire is not water or even milk, but mouthfuls of plain, steamed white rice. It was also the beginning of my own descent into what my mother felt was madness. From then on, my dad and I were like a cult, only instead of a god we worshipped capsaicin. We went to fancy hot sauce stores on vacation.

Sarah Austin : Sun Staff Writer

Goodbye Gingerbread, Hello Hamantaschen

Hamantaschen (noun): Jelly or chocolate filled, triangular shaped cookies that crop up around this time of year, and are obviously the superior holiday cookie. As a certified cookie expert (a.k.a. a product of the elusive freshman fifteen), I can assure you that cookies come in all shapes and sizes, and many are very similar. However,chocolate chip cookies, gingerbread and snickerdoodles all pale in comparison to hamantaschen. In early spring, there’s the Jewish holiday of Purim, celebrating the Jews triumph over a mass genocide. In addition to having a celebratory feast, we’ve also narrowed in on the triangular shaped cookie market.