Cornell Doubles-Down Commitment to Sustainability Measures Despite Pandemic

COVID-19’s ability to spread through air borne transmission, along with some transmission via contaminated surfaces, has necessitated social distancing measures that often run opposed to sustainable practices but through the pandemic Cornell has maintained its commitment to sustainability and eventual carbon neutrality.

Looking Ahead at the Next Four Years: What Biden’s Win Means for Climate Policy

In the 2020 presidential election, how scientific knowledge shapes policymakers’ decisions served as a political focal point, particularly as it relates to the COVID-19 pandemic and a recent surge in natural disasters. As historic wildfires and hurricanes swamp the nation, such policies will play a more key than ever role in the U.S.’ climate response.

‘It’s Time for a Change’: Scientists Break Political Silence in Lead Up to 2020 Election

many scientists are breaking their previous political silence. Several scientific publications, including the New England Journal of Medicine, Scientific American and the Lancet made their first political endorsement in their history. Additionally, scientists have been both actively endorsing candidates and partaking in the nationwide movement to encourage everyone to vote.

Cornell Researchers Collaborate to Investigate Environmental Consequences of Hydropower Dams

The Amazon River Basin is under threat, largely at the hands of humans. To help change that, Prof. Carla Gomes, computer science, Prof. Alexander Flecker, ecology and evolutionary biology, and Rafael Almeida, postdoctoral researcher with the Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future, designed an interdisciplinary research project to inform policymakers of the environmental consequences of human actions.

Second Ithaca Drought in Five Years Threatens Water Supply and Local Ecosystem

Last month, the water supply in Six Mile Creek was at a third of its average flow rate: an alarming five cubic feet per second as opposed to its standard rate of 15 cubic feet per second. The low flow rate prompted Cornell and the City of Ithaca to issue a Level 1: Limited Water Use Advisory to encourage more water conservation on Sept. 22. The advisory was lifted on Oct. 21.