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The Missing Link: Cornell Prof. finds Hidden Connections Between Energy and the Environment

Thanks to research like Cornell Prof. K. Max Zhang’s, energy providers are starting to create contingency plans to more efficiently store and distribute energy in residential voltaic systems. In the context of sunny winter days, for example, a system would store excess energy in the midday and distribute it for use when traditional energy production methods can’t meet the demands on their own.

(NYT18) UNDATED -- July 14, 2008 -- SCI-BRODY-HEALTH -- Photo Illustration. A Threat in a Grassy Stroll: Lyme Disease.  (Photo Illustration by Jez Burrows/The New York Times) *Only for use with NYT story entitled  SCI-BRODY-HEALTH. All other use prohibited.

Targeting Ticks: Cornell-Housed Company Designs New Lyme Disease Test

Dr. Joel Tabb and team at Ionica Sciences at Weill Cornell has developed a new and improved diagnostic test for Lyme disease. Unlike the current standard tests, that focus on the body’s immune response, Tabb’s test focuses on the disease causing bacteria itself and should be on the market by 2020.

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The Code Busters: The Girls Who Code Outreach Program at Cornell

Founded in 2013, Women in Computing at Cornell aims to increase the visibility of women in computing fields. The organization empowers and advises women in academic, social and professional settings and helps young girls pursue their passions in computing. One WICC program, the Girls Who Code Outreach Program, aims to solve the gender disparity in the tech industry. According to Stephanie Shum ’20, vice president of the WICC Outreach program, the GWC club has two classes offered every Sunday for middle school and high school students in the greater Tompkins community. Their lessons are typically taught in JavaScript but also utilize HTML, CSS, Arduinos and GitHub.

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Why Early Childhood Development Matters

The U.S. is far behind other nations in investment in early childhood, citing both China and Scandinavia as regions that have seen success in educating and funding programs for early childhood. He said that early childhood is not just important on an individual level but should be a matter of national importance.

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Undergraduate Research Shines at CURB Fall Forum

CURB aims to promote undergraduate research on campus, and the fall forum is one platform that allows students to do so. The event was organized by the symposium committee and encourages research from a diverse array of disciplines including biological sciences, engineering and applied science and social sciences.

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What if the World Went Vegan?

Although mention of the word “vegan” can bring up disturbing images of proselytizing protestors armed with signs and graphic visuals of animal cruelty, people often overlook the environmental impacts of reducing their consumption of animal products. Prof. David Wolfe, plant science, revealed his insight on the crippling carbon footprint of the meat industry, and what a plant-based diet would entail for the environment. “A lot of the major meat producers in this country are coming from fairly large operations and corporate farms [where] the carbon footprint is quite a bit higher,” Wolfe said. “The animals are all confined in one place —  it could be very far away from where the crops are grown and are then transported to feed the animals.”

According to Wolfe, the excessive amounts of fossil fuels utilized in the production and transport of these crops alone have a significant environmental impact. Ruminant animals, like cattle, have the added detriment of methanogens — microbes required for digestion that release methane, a notorious greenhouse gas.