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From Statler Hall to Eleven Madison Park: A Cornell Alum Success Story

This week, I was lucky enough to interview Max Aronson, a recent Cornell graduate from 2019. Graduating from the School of Hotel Administration with a concentration in Beverage Management, he is now an assistant server at Eleven Madison Park — a fine dining restaurant located in the Flatiron District of Manhattan. Eleven Madison Park is ranked third among The World’s 50 Best Restaurants in 2016 and is known for their taste and presentation. Let’s take a look at how Max is doing today. 1.

Brittainy Newman / The New York Times

How to? | Grocery Shopping During COVID-19

I didn’t want to come home. I enjoyed eating on campus, picking up apples at GreenStar and drinking cappuccinos from Gimme! Coffee. But even before I left Cornell to live at home with my parents, my family was discussing the plan for grocery shopping. My sister, who lives in New York City, insisted that I do the shopping instead of my parents, since their age puts them at a higher risk of complications from COVID-19.

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Student Spotlight on Samay Bansal ‘21: COVID-19 Hunger Relief Efforts

Hoping to make a difference in his community, Hotel School student Samay Bansal ‘21 founded Million Meals Mission in 2016. The nonprofit aims to reduce global food insecurity through alliances with grassroots partners and food distributors. His first goal was to feed 1,000,000 people a meal, after being inspired by The Shed that Fed a Million Children: The Extraordinary Story of Mary’s Meals, a book by entrepreneur and philanthropist Magnus MacFarlane-Barrow. MMM began its work in Ludhiana, India, and has since expanded to Saadi Rasoi, India, the LaValla primary school for physically disabled students in Cambodia and the organization Rise Against Hunger in its meal-distribution efforts. Today, MMM is doing its part to support populations impacted by food insecurity as a result of the global COVID-19 pandemic.

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When the City that Never Sleeps Takes a Rest: What Does That Mean for Local Farmers?

As empty restaurant tables continue to collect dust in New York City, 60 miles east in Brookhaven, Long Island, Early Girl Farm is bursting with life. Tomato, eggplant and pepper seedlings are beginning to extend their leafy limbs out into the world as employees carefully prepare the soil, adjusting its mineral levels and incorporating nutrient-rich compost to create optimal growing conditions for this summer’s crops. Patty Gentry, a former restaurant owner and chef turned professional farmer, owns and operates the small but mighty farm, which provides seasonal, organic produce to restaurants in the New York City Metro Area. 2020 marks Patty’s tenth year as a professional farmer. She is an expert in her field, who understands the science of organic farming down to the microscopic levels of soil composition.

Rulloff’s Restaurant on March 19, 2020. New York State ordered restaurants to cease dine-in operations on March 16. (Boris Tsang / Sun Photography Editor)

Rulloff’s: A Premature Goodbye

When I first went to Rulloff’s, located on 411 College Ave back in February, I thought I would be saying goodbye to the bar and restaurant since its building is set for demolition at the beginning of this summer to make room for an apartment complex. Unfortunately, we would instead be saying goodbye to Rulloff’s, like many other restaurants, as a result of the current COVID-19 pandemic. Plastered on its doors now are signs that read, “Due to the coronavirus crisis Rulloff’s is closed until further notice.”
When I dined there, I asked if Rulloff’s would open another location, and the waitress told me they honestly don’t know. However, the answer being “yes” is less likely given the new and upsetting reality all restaurants now face. Whether it was trips to Insomnia Cookies to take a study break, post-prelim boba runs, Chatty Cathy dates with my roommate, frequent and spontaneous stress-prompting trips to Mango Mango or celebrations at Koko — Collegetown restaurants have always been there for me during my time at Cornell.

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WEEK 2 RESULTS: Dining Hall March Madness Matchups

In week two of the Dining Hall March Madness Matchups, eight of Cornell’s finest eateries battled for supremacy in the eyes of The Sun’s subjective staff writers and editors. Here were the matchups. 

 

Trillium’s impressive short order lunch options, like ramen and quesadillas, are contesting Terrace’s famous burrito bar and phở station for a position in the Final Four. Risley may have defeated RPCC, but will gluten free, vegetarian and lactose intolerant friendly options be enough to take on Rose’s Sunday brunch specials? Keeton’s famed southern fair comes head-to-head with Cook house’s Indian specialties. Café Jennie shoots for victory by bolstering a large variety of macarons and specialty drinks, like turmeric tea — but will it be enough?

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Dining Hall March Madness Matchups

The time has come. The Dining Department will be officiating our very first March Madness tournament. Witness as Cornell University’s finest eateries battle head-to-head in hopes of becoming the most popular eatery on campus. Throughout the month, we will be polling all the writers and editors of the Sunspots, Dining, Arts and Entertainment and Opinion departments. 

While many of these locations are long-time favorites, such as Trillium, and Flora Rose House, underdogs like Nasties and the hotly contested Okenshields will need to snatch a lead early on if they hope to stay in the race. Will they find the support to do so?

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Shabbat Dinner: Cornell Edition

Around 6:30 p.m. on a Friday, if you walk past 102 Willard Way, you’ll see a group of men with thick beards armed with Kippahs and prayer books. At this time, they’re deep in focus, unified in prayer, speaking the Hebrew words that welcome in the Shabbat — the holiest day of the week. Around the world, thousands of synagogues join. Walk past the same building an hour later, and the sights and sounds of 102 Willard Way will be those you can’t find in synagogues anywhere else. Friday night Shabbat dinner is a culinary and cultural spectacle only the Chabad at Cornell can do.

Sanjana Kaicker / Sun Contributor

Going Against the Grain with Bread Club

Roughly every other Wednesday at 5 p.m., a dozen or so Cornellians gather in 158 Stocking Hall. This room, however, isn’t your ordinary lecture hall. It’s a fully decked-out kitchen supplied with baking tools from loaf pans to whisks and furnished with four ovens. Every two weeks, Bread Club meets to bake a new type of bread from scratch.

Rae Specht / Sun Staff Writer

Friday Night Macro Dinners: Everyone Is Family

Nestled amongst the maple trees off of Coddington Road, Priscilla Timberlake’s and Lewis Freedman’s cozy country house radiated warm light out into the chilly November night. For over twenty years, every Friday at 6:45pm about fifty people, an eclectic mix of friends, neighbors, colleagues, students and a handful of curious strangers, come together to share a home cooked, plant-based meal around candle-lit dinner tables. It’s best described as a giant, vegan, gluten-free family dinner, where the word “family” is employed loosely; in Priscilla and Lewis’s home, anyone and everyone is treated and fed like family.