Rulloff’s Restaurant on March 19, 2020. New York State ordered restaurants to cease dine-in operations on March 16. (Boris Tsang / Sun Photography Editor)

Rulloff’s: A Premature Goodbye

When I first went to Rulloff’s, located on 411 College Ave back in February, I thought I would be saying goodbye to the bar and restaurant since its building is set for demolition at the beginning of this summer to make room for an apartment complex. Unfortunately, we would instead be saying goodbye to Rulloff’s, like many other restaurants, as a result of the current COVID-19 pandemic. Plastered on its doors now are signs that read, “Due to the coronavirus crisis Rulloff’s is closed until further notice.”
When I dined there, I asked if Rulloff’s would open another location, and the waitress told me they honestly don’t know. However, the answer being “yes” is less likely given the new and upsetting reality all restaurants now face. Whether it was trips to Insomnia Cookies to take a study break, post-prelim boba runs, Chatty Cathy dates with my roommate, frequent and spontaneous stress-prompting trips to Mango Mango or celebrations at Koko — Collegetown restaurants have always been there for me during my time at Cornell.

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WEEK 2 RESULTS: Dining Hall March Madness Matchups

In week two of the Dining Hall March Madness Matchups, eight of Cornell’s finest eateries battled for supremacy in the eyes of The Sun’s subjective staff writers and editors. Here were the matchups. 

 

Trillium’s impressive short order lunch options, like ramen and quesadillas, are contesting Terrace’s famous burrito bar and phở station for a position in the Final Four. Risley may have defeated RPCC, but will gluten free, vegetarian and lactose intolerant friendly options be enough to take on Rose’s Sunday brunch specials? Keeton’s famed southern fair comes head-to-head with Cook house’s Indian specialties. Café Jennie shoots for victory by bolstering a large variety of macarons and specialty drinks, like turmeric tea — but will it be enough?

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Dining Hall March Madness Matchups

The time has come. The Dining Department will be officiating our very first March Madness tournament. Witness as Cornell University’s finest eateries battle head-to-head in hopes of becoming the most popular eatery on campus. Throughout the month, we will be polling all the writers and editors of the Sunspots, Dining, Arts and Entertainment and Opinion departments. 

While many of these locations are long-time favorites, such as Trillium, and Flora Rose House, underdogs like Nasties and the hotly contested Okenshields will need to snatch a lead early on if they hope to stay in the race. Will they find the support to do so?

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Shabbat Dinner: Cornell Edition

Around 6:30 p.m. on a Friday, if you walk past 102 Willard Way, you’ll see a group of men with thick beards armed with Kippahs and prayer books. At this time, they’re deep in focus, unified in prayer, speaking the Hebrew words that welcome in the Shabbat — the holiest day of the week. Around the world, thousands of synagogues join. Walk past the same building an hour later, and the sights and sounds of 102 Willard Way will be those you can’t find in synagogues anywhere else. Friday night Shabbat dinner is a culinary and cultural spectacle only the Chabad at Cornell can do.

Sanjana Kaicker / Sun Contributor

Going Against the Grain with Bread Club

Roughly every other Wednesday at 5 p.m., a dozen or so Cornellians gather in 158 Stocking Hall. This room, however, isn’t your ordinary lecture hall. It’s a fully decked-out kitchen supplied with baking tools from loaf pans to whisks and furnished with four ovens. Every two weeks, Bread Club meets to bake a new type of bread from scratch.

Rae Specht / Sun Staff Writer

Friday Night Macro Dinners: Everyone Is Family

Nestled amongst the maple trees off of Coddington Road, Priscilla Timberlake’s and Lewis Freedman’s cozy country house radiated warm light out into the chilly November night. For over twenty years, every Friday at 6:45pm about fifty people, an eclectic mix of friends, neighbors, colleagues, students and a handful of curious strangers, come together to share a home cooked, plant-based meal around candle-lit dinner tables. It’s best described as a giant, vegan, gluten-free family dinner, where the word “family” is employed loosely; in Priscilla and Lewis’s home, anyone and everyone is treated and fed like family.

Katie Zhang / Sun Dining Editor

Phở Night: A Night of Nostalgia

The Cornell Vietnamese Association’s annual Pho Night was a night of nostalgia for anyone of Vietnamese descent. The event, held on Nov. 17 in T the Memorial Room at Willard Straight Hall, provided an opportunity to eat the most well-known Vietnamese dish, phở, as well as other traditional Vietnamese dishes to celebrate Vietnamese culture as a community.

Meridien Mach / Sun Contributor

Makan-Mania: A Celebration of Singaporean Culture

On Oct. 26, the Singapore Student Association held its annual Makan-Mania in the Okenshields Dining Hall. Makan means “to eat” in Malay. That is exactly what this event served as: An opportunity to eat traditional Singapore dishes that celebrated Singaporean culture and food in the Cornell community.

Jack Waxman / Sun Contributor

Dig In | Paw-Paw Ice Cream, Dragon Beans and Wild Bee Honey: Treasures and Lessons from the Farm at Dilmun Hill

Teddy asks me, “These are paw-paw trees. Have you ever seen them before?”

“No, but they are super cool. Is it a kind of fruit?” I respond.

“Yes. Native to Kentucky. It grows like it is native to New York. Plant it and it grows. We are going to try to make some paw-paw ice cream.”

This is my introduction to Dilmun Hill Student Farm, a 12-acre student-run farm that has been practicing sustainable agriculture on Cornell University’s campus for more than a decade.

Ithacans gather in the Commons for the annual Apple Harvest Festival on Saturday, Sep 28. (Michael Suguitan / Sun Senior Photographer).

Apple Harvest Festival: A Snapshot of Life Upstate

In true Ithaca fashion, Apple Harvest Festival is something caught between a nostalgic, agrarian county fair and an eclectic, trendy Brooklyn food festival. It’s a celebration of all things apple — apple pies, apple cider and candied apples — but more than that, it’s a celebration of the Finger Lakes area and the people who shape it. With millions of acres of farmland (52,000 of which are devoted exclusively to apple orchards), Upstate New York is a mecca for farmers, chefs, bakers and wine makers who come together one weekend in late September to share their passion for food with the masses.