American flag cookies. (Amelia Clute / Sun Contributor)

Patriotic Meals: Food as a Stepping-Stone Towards Liberation

Every Fourth of July, Americans are bombarded with advertisements about red and white products — it almost feels patriotic to spend money. Oftentimes, these companies advertise food sales — five dollar watermelon or hot dogs on a stars-and-stripes background — and imply that these items have some inherent patriotic identity. All-American men eat meat, a  Costco ad might urge you. Most of us don’t truly believe that we are performing our civic duty when we buy a hot dog; however, there was a time in American history when one’s diet was directly tied to their love and devotion — or lack thereof — to America. To understand American patriotism as it relates to food, we must go back to British Colonialism in the early 1600s.

(Tony Cenicola / The New York Times)

Quarantine Cookout: How Coronavirus is Changing the Dynamics of Summer

What does sand in the winter and not being able to find parking in front of your house have in common? They’re both indicators that you live in a beach town. Summer 2020 is undoubtedly one for the books. From lost internships to canceled vacations, everyone is feeling the effects of coronavirus in some way or another. These feelings are felt all the more deeply in a beach town.

Harvesting carrots at a Community Supported Agriculture plot. (Brianna Johnson / Sun Contributor)

Racial & Food Justice — A Resource

As the murder of George Floyd has shocked the nation into protest and the realities of systemic racism are further exposed, it is important to consider just how deeply this racism permeates. As the farmers market pavilion in Ithaca opens for its 46th year and many home gardens in the upstate region finally begin to flourish after a long winter’s frost, it is incredibly important to consider the intersection of food and racial justice. Our country was founded on colonialism and inequality. These same inequalities proliferate into our current food system, creating vast disparities in access to food and land. As a growing number of movements seek to dismantle our current food system in hopes of erecting one founded on principles of sustainability, health and justice, we must also acknowledge that food justice is racial justice.

José Andrés (center) cooking in Puerto Rico.(Eric Rojas / The New York Times)

Recipes For The People: A Hot Plate of Food When It’s Needed Most

Two weeks ago, I came across a video on Twitter called #RecipesForThePeople. It was a cooking video posted by José Andrés, a Spanish-American chef and founder of World Central Kitchen, a non-profit devoted to providing meals in the wake of natural disasters. In this six minute clip, Andrés and his daughters made angel hair pasta and tomato sauce as they sang and danced their way through Hamilton. The internet went crazy — from, “I did not think I could love José Andrés more. I was wrong.

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From Statler Hall to Eleven Madison Park: A Cornell Alum Success Story

This week, I was lucky enough to interview Max Aronson, a recent Cornell graduate from 2019. Graduating from the School of Hotel Administration with a concentration in Beverage Management, he is now an assistant server at Eleven Madison Park — a fine dining restaurant located in the Flatiron District of Manhattan. Eleven Madison Park is ranked third among The World’s 50 Best Restaurants in 2016 and is known for their taste and presentation. Let’s take a look at how Max is doing today. 1.

Brittainy Newman / The New York Times

How to? | Grocery Shopping During COVID-19

I didn’t want to come home. I enjoyed eating on campus, picking up apples at GreenStar and drinking cappuccinos from Gimme! Coffee. But even before I left Cornell to live at home with my parents, my family was discussing the plan for grocery shopping. My sister, who lives in New York City, insisted that I do the shopping instead of my parents, since their age puts them at a higher risk of complications from COVID-19.

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Student Spotlight on Samay Bansal ‘21: COVID-19 Hunger Relief Efforts

Hoping to make a difference in his community, Hotel School student Samay Bansal ‘21 founded Million Meals Mission in 2016. The nonprofit aims to reduce global food insecurity through alliances with grassroots partners and food distributors. His first goal was to feed 1,000,000 people a meal, after being inspired by The Shed that Fed a Million Children: The Extraordinary Story of Mary’s Meals, a book by entrepreneur and philanthropist Magnus MacFarlane-Barrow. MMM began its work in Ludhiana, India, and has since expanded to Saadi Rasoi, India, the LaValla primary school for physically disabled students in Cambodia and the organization Rise Against Hunger in its meal-distribution efforts. Today, MMM is doing its part to support populations impacted by food insecurity as a result of the global COVID-19 pandemic.

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When the City that Never Sleeps Takes a Rest: What Does That Mean for Local Farmers?

As empty restaurant tables continue to collect dust in New York City, 60 miles east in Brookhaven, Long Island, Early Girl Farm is bursting with life. Tomato, eggplant and pepper seedlings are beginning to extend their leafy limbs out into the world as employees carefully prepare the soil, adjusting its mineral levels and incorporating nutrient-rich compost to create optimal growing conditions for this summer’s crops. Patty Gentry, a former restaurant owner and chef turned professional farmer, owns and operates the small but mighty farm, which provides seasonal, organic produce to restaurants in the New York City Metro Area. 2020 marks Patty’s tenth year as a professional farmer. She is an expert in her field, who understands the science of organic farming down to the microscopic levels of soil composition.

Rulloff’s Restaurant on March 19, 2020. New York State ordered restaurants to cease dine-in operations on March 16. (Boris Tsang / Sun Photography Editor)

Rulloff’s: A Premature Goodbye

When I first went to Rulloff’s, located on 411 College Ave back in February, I thought I would be saying goodbye to the bar and restaurant since its building is set for demolition at the beginning of this summer to make room for an apartment complex. Unfortunately, we would instead be saying goodbye to Rulloff’s, like many other restaurants, as a result of the current COVID-19 pandemic. Plastered on its doors now are signs that read, “Due to the coronavirus crisis Rulloff’s is closed until further notice.”
When I dined there, I asked if Rulloff’s would open another location, and the waitress told me they honestly don’t know. However, the answer being “yes” is less likely given the new and upsetting reality all restaurants now face. Whether it was trips to Insomnia Cookies to take a study break, post-prelim boba runs, Chatty Cathy dates with my roommate, frequent and spontaneous stress-prompting trips to Mango Mango or celebrations at Koko — Collegetown restaurants have always been there for me during my time at Cornell.

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WEEK 2 RESULTS: Dining Hall March Madness Matchups

In week two of the Dining Hall March Madness Matchups, eight of Cornell’s finest eateries battled for supremacy in the eyes of The Sun’s subjective staff writers and editors. Here were the matchups. 

 

Trillium’s impressive short order lunch options, like ramen and quesadillas, are contesting Terrace’s famous burrito bar and phở station for a position in the Final Four. Risley may have defeated RPCC, but will gluten free, vegetarian and lactose intolerant friendly options be enough to take on Rose’s Sunday brunch specials? Keeton’s famed southern fair comes head-to-head with Cook house’s Indian specialties. Café Jennie shoots for victory by bolstering a large variety of macarons and specialty drinks, like turmeric tea — but will it be enough?