Sherry Wu / Sun Contributor

RIP Synapsis (2008-2017): Students React to Impending Closure of Beloved Eatery

News of Synapsis closing down has been met with surprise from many students. Long-time patron Timothy Krausz ’17 gave high praise for Synapsis, saying that, “even if my lab wasn’t next door to Synapsis, I would still go out of my way for the all-day breakfast burritos and coffee — the best coffee on campus.”

Courtesy of BigRed Hacks' Facebook page

Students Come Together to Code, Solve Problems at BigRed Hacks

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Have you ever found yourself with friends, in need of a stereo system to play music, but with none in sight? Problem solved. A group of University of Buffalo students took up their weekend to design Goofy, an app which creates a loudspeaker system from your phones, syncing the same song across a number of devices and thus amplifying the sound.  All you have to do is take a picture, wait for the system to randomly choose a song based on your mood, and sync it across your friends’ phones. Where was this and so many other cool apps and websites designed?

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Cornell ECE Director Discusses Department Presence and Opportunities

Nestled among some of Cornell’s most contemporary edifices, Phillips Hall can be easy to miss. Regardless, it is home to the College of Electrical and Computer Engineering which is engaged in some of the most cutting edge work on campus. That has been the case since 1883, when the discipline of electrical engineering began to rise on Cornell’s fledgling campus. Indeed, this discipline was the first of its kind in the nation, and while other schools would soon follow, it was rarely without Cornell’s leadership. Stanford, for instance, started a similar program the following year—“by stealing members of our faculty,” Clifford Pollock, the current director of electrical and computer engineering, is quick to add that qualifier with a  smile.

Prof. Emeritus Frank Moon, engineering, details the history of the engineering college Friday ( Brittney Chew / Sun News Photography Editor).

Faculty Gather to Remember Engineering College’s Storied History

Festivities for Cornell Engineering’s sesquicentennial commenced with a welcoming presentation on its history  Friday, featuring keynote speakers Lance Collins, dean of the engineerng college, Prof. Emeritus Francis Moon, engineering, and Prof. Emeritus John Abel, civil and environmental engineering. The College of Engineering has a rich history at Cornell, according to Moon, who served as the director of the Sibley School of Mechanic Arts from 1987 to 1992. The Morill Land Grant Act of 1862 required the teaching of mechanical engineering, but at the time, there was no model for the curriculum of mechanical technology. Through the joint efforts of leading figures like philanthropist Hiram Sibley and engineer Robert Thurston, the Sibley College paved the way for the education of mechanical engineering. Mechanical, electrical and civil engineering grew in prominence between 1885 and the early 1900s, Moon said.

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Cornucopia | Henry ’16 Talks Possibilities For Sustainable Engineering on Cornell Campus

Cornucopia is a biweekly podcast that covers research stories unfolding across campus. Join hosts Addison Huneycutt ’18 and Ali Jenkins ’18 as they dig into the juiciest discoveries they can find. In each episode, you’ll meet a researcher, chat with Addison and Ali, and hear some corny jokes. Check out the science section of The Cornell Daily Sun for biweekly updates about the latest episode. https://soundcloud.com/cornell-sun-science/cornucopia-episode-3

Ali and Addison sat down with the president of Engineers for a Sustainable World, Mark Henry ’16.

Engineering Prioritizes Instruction And Research in Face of Budget Cuts

This is the last article in a series examining the effects of the University’s budget cuts on individual schools and colleges.

When President David Skorton announced Cornell’s financial cuts in the latter half of 2008, the University’s colleges were faced with the difficult task of reducing their budgets by 4.8 percent. For the College of Engineering, like the other colleges, meeting the cuts has been a particularly troublesome burden.

Engineering School Eliminates Career Fair

On Monday, rather than teeming with the buzz of networking engineers trying to make contacts and good impressions for recruiters and potential employers, Barton Hall was void of any unusual activity.
This year’s Engineering Career Fair that was scheduled to take place on Monday was cancelled in December.
“Planning hadn’t proceeded to a point where we all felt comfortable that we could put on an event that would represent the quality and excellence of our students and the college,” Assistant Dean for Student Services Betsy East said, explaining the College of Engineering’s decision to cancel the event.

Course Evaluations Serve As a Tool in Class Selection

Many students see course evaluations merely as a tedious end-of-the-semester chore. However, some of Cornell’s colleges are working to turn course evaluations into a tool students can use in considering which classes they should take. Last February, the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences’ Faculty Senate voted to make the numerical component of their course evaluations available to the Cornell community.