DZODZOMENYO | What You’re Probably Missing About Blackface

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s re-election campaign was thrust into chaos last week when decades-old photos emerged of the self-proclaimed “woke” PMILF wearing culturally imitative costumes and brown and black face paint. Canadians of all colors withdrew their support and expressed shock, betrayal, scorn and disgust. I, on the other hand, felt there were bigger fish to fry. I don’t think what Trudeau did actually deserves the level of attention it’s been getting. The vast majority of people, whether or not they protested, didn’t seem to understand what was wrong with his actions, the history that underlies them and, most importantly, how likely they are to have committed a similar offense sometime that past week.

Latin Americans Expect Improvement, But Reality May Not Be As Desirable, Political Scientist Says

Over the past two decades, the underprivileged populations of Latin America have been waiting and organizing for representation under electoral democracy, according to Prof. Evelyne Huber, political science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Now, at a critical juncture in regional and international politics, that waiting may come to a head.

New Study Offers Insight Into Gender Imbalance in Higher Education

Gender inequality in science, technology, engineering and math has been a long documented issue, but a new study coming out of the Cornell Center for the Study of Inequality offers encouraging evidence of avenues to bridge this divide. Dafna Gelbgiser, grad, and Kyle Albert, grad, found that green fields in higher education tend to bridge the gender divide in both STEM and non-STEM fields. Gelbgiser defined green fields as those that contribute to green jobs, which provide goods or have production processes that benefit the environment. Examples of such fields include environmental science and sustainability studies. Gelbgiser explained that both she and Albert were interested in studying green fields since they could track “what happens when a new field of study emerges in terms of gender inequality in those fields.”

According to Gelbgiser, green fields are unique because they do not have clear roots in other disciplines.

What to Avoid Next

When Michael Moore responded to the deaths of 12 innocent high school students with Bowling for Columbine, no one could have argued against the film’s political significance. A fiery critique of congressional negligence to curb gun violence, Moore’s impassioned documentary was so charged with a palpable, collective anger that many still refer to it as one of the most compelling political statements made by any documentarian. Even watching Bowling for Columbine nearly a decade after its initial release as an Australian high school student did little to weaken my appreciation of its persuasive fury. And the fact that U.S. legislators have failed to account for the thousands of victims of gun violence and have written off their deaths as an acceptable cost for the preservation of a 200-year-old constitutional amendment has only strengthened the contemporary legacy of Moore’s most important work. Moore’s latest film, Where to Invade Next — despite being deceptively titled to suggest a censure of American foreign policy — focuses on social welfare offered by other countries that Moore believes America ought to imitate.