LEE | The Need for Fundamental Reform in the Catholic Church

Anger, sorrow, disbelief — these were just some of the emotions I felt upon receiving news that our university’s Catholic chaplain Father Carsten Martensen received allegations for sexual abuse of a minor in the 1970s. To any other individual, this may have been just one of the many recent attestations of the Roman Catholic clergy’s sexual abuse cases. Yet, I had never personally experienced, nor did I ever expect, such allegations arising from within my very own community. The news came as an utter shock and disturbance — to think that the chaplain who had provided significant guidance and wisdom throughout my time here at Cornell may have possibly exploited a child and kept silent for all these years. Catholicism has been an important part of my life, especially at Cornell.

PINERO | The Case for Spirituality in a Secular World

After sitting for my senior portrait, each step I took as I emerged from Willard Straight felt suddenly significant — as though each was one closer to my youth’s looming end. I felt an unfamiliar urge for quiet contemplation and reflection. Sage Chapel seemed to beckon, so I obliged. The pilgrimage to Sage quickly became a part of my routine; five daily minutes in a sanctuary with a Bible seems to keep me spiritually satiated. I don’t consider myself religious, but I do, however, find solace in the words of radicals — people who dare to challenge the status quo and evangelize our collective imagination.

Hamlet (1921) with the Filmharmonia Duo Coming to Sage Chapel

We’re all probably familiar with the story of Shakespeare’s Hamlet – Hamlet, prince of Denmark, seeks revenge on his uncle at the behest of his father’s ghost, all the while finding the time to talk to skulls, wallow in existential dread, etc. etc. However, this 1921 German silent film adaptation turns the familiar tale on its head, doing so with a very interesting proposition from Dr. Edward P. Vining’s 1881 book: Hamlet is actually a woman.  

This not actually as unusual as it might seem; there is, in fact, a long and rich tradition of female Hamlets. After Charles II gave permission for women to act, the first woman to appear in a Shakespeare play did so in 1660, and soon afterwards, women began playing not only women’s roles but also those of men.

History: Finding Cornell’s Forefathers in Sage Chapel Crypt

This is the first in a series examining Cornell’s underground hot spots.

While Cornell is often described as being “far above,” evoking images of the clocktower and majestic buildings, there is a whole world to explore beneath the surface of campus. With more than 260 major buildings on 745 acres of land, the Cornell campus is filled with mysterious basements, tunnels and vaults.

Red Letter Daze: Saying 'I Do' at C.U.

Gul Gunaydin grad is a true expert on marriage between young couples — not only does she study interpersonal relationships as a graduate student in social psychology, but she also married her boyfriend of four years, Emre Selcuk grad, right here at Cornell in September. The two graduate students held their wedding behind the A.D. White House, and a friend from the psychology department led the ceremony with a group of faculty and friends in attendance.
Both newlyweds are originally from Turkey. After four years of dating and relocating to Ithaca for graduate school, getting married not only felt right, it was also convenient, given their living situation. “Since we would be living in the same house in Ithaca, we thought it would be convenient to get married,” Gunaydin joked.