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Mentors Honor Garrett at Inauguration Dinner

Hundreds of Cornellians, dignitaries and friends of President Elizabeth Garrett gathered in Barton Hall on to honor her at the inauguration dinner Thursday evening. Nearly 550 attended the event, mingling during a reception before being seated at the dinner, where Garrett’s mentors spoke highly of her accomplishments. After a performance from Cornell Bhangra, Board of Trustees Chair Robert Harrison ’76 addressed the crowd, praising Garrett for bringing “together the perfect blend of academic accomplishment, public service and the experience” needed for running Cornell. “President Garrett, we wish you good health, good judgment and bold vision. Go Big Red and welcome to Cornell,” he offered in a toast.

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Elizabeth Garrett Outlines Vision at 13th Inauguration

Hundreds of students, faculty, University dignitaries, alumni and staff filled the Arts Quad on Friday morning for the installation ceremony of Cornell’s 13th president, Elizabeth Garrett. The ceremony began with a performance by Yamatai — Cornell’s taiko drumming group— immediately followed by the procession of the undergraduate and graduate colleges and professors. Former Cornell presidents Frank Rhodes, Jeffrey Lehman ’77 and David Skorton were in attendance, as well as Kathleen Hochul, New York Lieutenant Governor and representatives from 84 universities and colleges across the globe. Directly before Garrett’s speech. Robert Harrison ’76, Chairman of the Board of Trustees, gave an introductory speech and led the Investiture of The President, a formal presentation of symbols related to the president’s responsibilities.

EDITORIAL: A Bold Vision for Cornell

Throughout the course of the Homecoming and Inauguration weekend, President Elizabeth Garrett repeatedly reaffirmed her stances on the future of Cornell. While she continued to outline her focus on faculty and academia, areas that she has brought up as prioritizing since arriving at Cornell, Garrett also unveiled her stances on a number of other issues facing Cornell and the rest of higher education moving forward. We believe the points made by the newly-inaugurated president this weekend represent a bold vision for the future of Cornell and are optimistic about what her presidency will do for the University. Garrett, who provided small hints as to what her priorities are for both the coming year and the future of the University up until this weekend, began to outline her platform Thursday evening during her inaugural dinner. She stressed that Cornell “stands in a crucial point in its history of higher education,” and that seizing the moment is imperative.

(Brittney Chew / Sun News Photography Editor)

INAUGURATION | Presidential Treats: A Dairy Bar Tradition

(Brittney Chew / Sun News Photography Editor)
Two new ice cream flavors are coming to Cornell Dairy for Homecoming Weekend, in honor of President Elizabeth Garrett’s official inauguration and Touchdown the unofficial mascot. Cornell Dairy hosted a student-voted contest online and on campus this September to choose a name for the new flavor dedicated to Garrett’s inauguration. The contest yielded “24 Garrett Swirl” as the winner, beating out rivals “Garrett’s Chocolate Bar Association” and “Cornelle Chocolate Chunk.”
The flavor will be revealed today at the Cornell Community Picnic taking place on the Ag Quad from noon to 2 p.m., immediately following the 10 a.m. inauguration ceremony. Samples will be available to the public. In addition to 24 Garrett Swirl, Homecoming attendees will be able to sample a new Touchdown-themed flavor on Saturday morning at Teagle Hall, when President Garrett reveals the new Class of 1915 plaza and Touchdown statue.

Historic Obama Inauguration Captivates C.U.

Students across campus witnessed the momentous inauguration of Barack Obama yesterday through live broadcasts inside and outside of the classroom. Although yesterday marked the first day of class for many courses, some were cancelled or dismissed early so students could watch the first transition of power in eight years. In other cases, professors traded their PowerPoint slideshows for live streams of the ceremony.[img_assist|nid=34264|title=A standing “O”|desc=Students pack Bailey Hall to capacity yesterday to watch Obama’s inaugural speech live.|link=node|align=right|width=|height=0]
It has been months since fireworks were set off in Collegetown to celebrate Obama’s election, but the excitement remained for some.

Barack Obama Inaugurated as 44th U.S. President

WASHINGTON (AP) — Stepping into history, Barack Hussein Obama grasped the reins of power as America’s first black president on Tuesday, declaring the nation must choose “hope over fear, unity of purpose over conflict and discord” to overcome the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression.
In frigid temperatures, an exuberant crowd of more than a million packed the National Mall and parade route to celebrate Obama’s inauguration in a high-noon ceremony. Waving and cheering in jubilation, they stretched from the inaugural platform at the U.S. Capitol toward the Lincoln Memorial in the distance.

Inauguration Draws Millions to D.C.

WASHINGTON D.C. — Hundreds of thousands of people of all ages and backgrounds flooded D.C. this weekend, soaking up the energetic atmosphere and preparing to play a part in history.
On the eve of Barack Obama’s inauguration, the streets were already buzzing, despite frigid temperatures in the 20s.
“It’s hot. It’s not cold out here, it’s hot,” said Anthony Brown, a photographer for the police department. “It’s a beautiful moment, a beautiful day in history right here.”

44th Inauguration Continues Traditions of Past

Many changes have taken place since the first inauguration of President George Washington in 1789. With the events scheduled for today’s swearing in of the 44th president of the United States, Barack Obama’s inauguration stands to be not only the most watched in U.S. history, but also the most expensive. The price tag of this inauguration will likely top $150 million.
The ceremony has evolved considerably since 1789. On the bicentennial year of President Abraham Lincoln’s birth, this year’s ceremony will pay tribute to the president who ended slavery and was the first to include African-Americans in his inaugural parade. In addition to paying his respects at the Lincoln Memorial last week, Obama requested to use Lincoln’s 1861 inaugural bible as he is sworn into office.

Obama Brings Hope, Optimism to Kenya

After Barack Obama’s victory in November, many jubilant Americans who had stayed up late celebrating returned to work. This was not true in Kenya, where President Mwai Kibaki declared the Thursday after Election Day a public holiday.
James Mwaura ’10, who was born and raised in Kenya, said that although he was not in Kenya on Election Day, his Kenyan relatives told him the reaction “was even crazier” there, in the country where Obama’s father was born and raised.
Although Obama barely knew his Kenyan relatives, Mwaura said, “Lots of people feel a kinship to him.”

International Students Weigh in on Obama

When Barack Obama was declared the next president of the United States, his promise of hope and change enthralled people beyond American borders.
Months later, at the eve of Obama’s inauguration, many international students at Cornell expressed their “cautious optimism” over the next president of the United States.
At the Holland International Living Center, where a crowd gathered in November to watch Election Night unfold, a resident noted that he has never met any international student at Cornell who supported the Republican candidate, John McCain. Many residents generally welcomed Obama’s presidency, but they also remarked that people’s expectations on Obama could be too high.