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LEE | You Belong Here

Almost a month into the fall semester, many students like myself probably find themselves questioning how they had been accepted here or whether Cornell is the right place for them. To anyone doubting themselves or feeling alienated, I want to tell you that you are not alone. Thousands of Cornellians who have also walked along the Arts Quad know what it’s like to feel lost on this large campus. Walking home from Uris Library at 3 a.m. or watching the sun set on Libe Slope, we have all been worn out at some point. It’s okay to feel hopeless.

Letter to the Editor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Re: ‘Who Cares if Cornell Cares?’

In the “Discourse and Discord” column published September 11, Mr. Wu wrote “Choosing who will build an apartment complex should be an economic decision, not a moral one.” This statement is fundamentally fallacious. ALL decisions have a moral component. Every single one. The decision to go get food at The Nines vs McDonalds has a moral component, as does the decision to go get food at a restaurant vs cooking food at home.

Guest Room

This post was removed from our website because its publishing inadvertently violated The Sun’s division of objective reporting and opinionated writing. Reporters for our News, Sports and Science sections are not able to publish opinion columns during their time as a reporter. The Sun apologizes for this error.

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TAARIQ | How to Cheat at Cornell  

Whether this is an aggressive reminder for upperclassmen, or painfully true advice for freshmen, learning how to really cheat at Cornell is essential. You don’t need to type all of the answers in your fancy calculator the night before the test to cheat at Cornell, and you definitely don’t need to become friends with a little blue or orange pill. You don’t need to write formulas on your fingernail or notes on the inside of your water bottle.  To really get ahead of your friends here, it is all about knowing the right resources, knowing the right people and knowing the right study spots. First thing is first, know no one cares if you were top of your class, valedictorian, student body president or captain of Mathematics Olympiad.

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LEUNG | Avoiding the Void

 

I still remember how ecstatic I was when I landed an opinion column my first semester at Cornell — an over-eager, naive, freshman who was still unsure about her purpose and existence in Ithaca had made it into the newspaper! The future looked bright. And if you’ve followed my journey these last few years, then I applaud your voracity, commitment, support and skepticism. Because you, like me, are most likely still trying to figure out what the hell you’re doing with whatever you’ve been given. Three years later, and I am nowhere closer to finding the answers I sought so eagerly when I was a freshman.

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BENITEZ | The Solipsism of Identity Politics

To fully understand marginalization, one needs to have experienced said marginalization first-hand. This assumption is increasingly fundamental to today’s practice of identity politics, evident in the higher credence many claim ought to be afforded to those who experience racism, sexism, transphobia and whatever other forms of exclusion we can theorize about. In philosophical language, this notion asserts that there is certain phenomenal knowledge — or knowledge about the subjective, first-hand experience of a phenomenon by a conscious entity — that cannot be a priori deduced from full physical knowledge of that conscious entity. Fully knowing everything about, say, a person’s neurobiology down to the most fundamental, subatomic level will fail to yield insight into what it is like for them to have experienced marginalization. This is particularly evident in leftist attitudes within the United States, where people of a marginalized identity often invoke it — for example, “as a gay person of color, I believe …” — to pontificate from a more authoritative position.

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BARAN | Honestly: Veganism, Schmeganism

I’m a member of the conservative right, and I pride myself on tradition. I’m old-fashioned, and I’m not afraid to say it. Faith, freedom and family all the way, baby! My core values are hard work and grit, and I think today’s society is too soft. People need to toughen up, stay on the straight and narrow, and then they can dig themselves out of any rut they find themselves in.

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BRONFIN | Revolving Around The Sun

I joined The Sun because I loved sports. And partially because my best friend Scott joined his college newspaper and I figured if Scott, a decidedly average writer, could cover sports in college, then so could I. But mostly because I loved sports. It’s been four years, and my love for sports has diminished. Yes, I still follow LeBron James way too closely for anyone outside of Cleveland and I could rattle off far too many Division I college mascots, but I find myself disinterested in games or standings or even entire sports (sorry, baseball). Yet, thanks to my time on The Sun, that passion for sports has been replaced with a love of writing, an appreciation for journalism and a community of talented, caring friends.

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POLLACK | The Lion in the Path

I’ve long feared this moment — not the one where I don a cap and gown, cross a stage or two, pick up a piece of paper and enter the rat race after twenty-one years of nurture. No, the moment I’ve feared most is having to convince the Cornell Daily Sun’s readership that the photo editor can write more than a one sentence cutline. That moment is here. Here goes nothing. I didn’t study photography at Cornell.

Guest Room

GUEST ROOM | Continue to Challenge Close-Mindedness at Cornell

On May 1, the Cornell University College Republicans hosted former Vice President Dick Cheney on campus for a lecture and question-and-answer session that was co-sponsored by Young America’s Foundation, a national conservative youth organization. Despite repeated attempts by a group of students and faculty members to prevent the event from occurring as planned, the College Republicans successfully organized a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for nearly 550 interested students and community members to hear from one of the most consequential conservative leaders in recent history. Vice President Cheney delivered wide-ranging remarks, addressing topics such as his justification for the U.S. invasion of Iraq, the U.S. enhanced interrogation program and the Iran nuclear deal, among others. These were all topics that were at the top of mind for those attending the event, as the questions were submitted directly by the public and posed to Cheney verbatim. The majority of audience members were respectful and clearly interested in hearing Cheney’s point of view.